Kathleen Logue volunteered for an experiment designed to test whether taking a pill immediately after a terrorizing experience might reduce the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study is part of a promising but controversial field of research seeking to alter, or possibly erase, the impact of painful memories — a concept dubbed “therapeutic forgetting”.

Logue was waiting at a traffic light when two men smashed her car’s side window, pointed a gun at her head and ordered her to drive. For hours, Logue fought off her attackers’ attempts to rape her, and finally she escaped. But for years afterward, she was tormented by memories of that terrifying day.



So years later, after a speeding bicycle messenger knocked the Boston paralegal onto the pavement in front of oncoming traffic, Logue jumped at a chance to try something that might prevent her from being haunted by her latest ordeal.



“I didn’t want to suffer years and years of cold sweats and nightmares and not being able to function again,” Logue said. “I was prone to it because I had suffered post-traumatic stress from being carjacked. I didn’t want to go through that again.”



Proponents say it could lead to pills that prevent or treat PTSD in soldiers coping with the horrors of battle, torture victims recovering from brutalization, survivors who fled the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, and other victims of severe, psychologically devastating experiences.



More here.

0