Ulduz Hashimova first studied people of longevity (90 years or older) from a Talysh village close to the Iranian border. There she found the palm prints “very, very symmetrical.”
Then she printed children in cotton producing regions in central Azerbaijan who had been exposed to high levels of pesticides. Asymmetry was quite evident.

Measuring the Effect of Pollution with Palm Prints

Typically, geneticist researchers take blood samples. But Ulduz Hashimova’s sampling requires no hypodermic needles in an age when everyone is fearful of AIDS, nor the accompanying paraphernalia of test tubes, refrigeration and chemical reagents. It’s a methodology that every Research Institute strapped for financial resources could wish for. Ulduz Hashimova at Azerbaijan Academy of Science reads palms.

Mind you she’s not pcychic. The methodology apart from being astonishingly simple, has a quantitative basis, is easily replicated and, very importantly, is very cheap. The only equipment necessary for both testing and analysis is black ink, sponge, paper, pencil, ruler and compass. A calculator would help ease mathematical calculations.

Ulduz Hashimova studied the corelation between environment, the hand, and the length of life.
As a baseline for her studies, Hashimova first studied people of longevity (90 years or older) from a Talysh village close to the Iranian border. There she found the palm prints “very, very symmetrical.”
Then she printed children in cotton producing regions in central Azerbaijan who had been exposed to high levels of pesticides. Asymmetry was quite evident. Schizophrenics and diabetics were studied, too, with the same result.

But the most dramatic cases of asymmetry were found in children who lived in Sumgayit, Azerbaijan’s highly toxic petro-chemical manufacturing city. There she printed malformed babies, some with six fingers and cleft lips, and some mentally challenged with Down’s Syndrome. Sumgayit’s prints showed the highest pronounced level of asymmetry.

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