Like humans, monkeys will pay to see images of powerful and sexually attractive individuals, showing that they also value information according to its social content.


Economics and evolutionary theory predict that animals should selectively acquire information about others that’s most useful for guiding behavior.



Researchers at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina have now provided evidence for the theory in male rhesus macaque monkeys.



In most monkey social groups, behavior is structured by kinship, dominance and reproductive status.



This suggests that related social information should be valued.



Previous studies have shown that monkeys would work to see other monkeys.



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