Dissident scientists advocating a controversial theory of the universe are having a field day in the wake of NASA’s Deep Impact comet collision earlier this month.

Scientists promoting the Electric Universe model say their predictions for the comet mission appear to have been more accurate than NASA’s.

This false-color image shows comet Tempel 1 about 50 minutes after Deep Impact’s probe smashed into its surface. The impact site is located on the far side of the comet in this view. The image was taken by the mission’s flyby spacecraft as it turned back to face the comet for one last photo op.

The Electric Universe theorists, collected at Thunderbolts.info, believe that electricity, when factored properly into astrophysics, plays a greater role in the cosmos than the standard gravitational model, which says electrical forces are insignificant on a cosmic scale.

Proponents of the Electric Universe model say they can explain many of the bizarre phenomena and mysteries in cosmology, from a swath of anomalies seen in the solar system to unusual surface features on Mars and Jupiter’s moon, Titan. The theory can also sweep away the need for theoretical “dark matter” and “dark energy.”

Comets are a cornerstone of the model, visible proof of the legitimacy of the theory as they traverse eccentric orbits around the sun.

According to the model, comets are not inert balls of ice and rocky dust particles aggregated into a “dirty iceball” as standard comet theory holds. Instead, they are solid, asteroid-like rocks, containing little ice. Negatively charged with electricity, their motion through the positively charged solar wind triggers electrical discharges. These, not vaporized ice, produce the characteristic comet glow and tail.

Prior to the July 4 impact, the Electric Universe group published a detailed chain of events they expected to see when Deep Impact struck comet Tempel 1 with an 820-pound copper projectile.

The prediction said there would be two impact flashes: a small flash as the projectile penetrated the comet’s electrified atmosphere, followed by a huge impact flash that would be “unexpectedly energetic.”

And that’s exactly what appeared to happen on July 4, in an impact that astonished NASA investigators.

By David McCandless

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