Everyone agrees that online gambling is a big business, but according to a new
survey hardly anybody admits to gambling online.  Great stats.


Can you say "I don’t gamble online" with a straight face?

Someone is gambling online. eMarketer estimates that over $10 billion was wagered on the Internet last year.

Not only that, data from
Nielsen//NetRatings
shows that roughly 20 million US Internet users visit gambling or
sweepstake websites a month, that’s nearly 15% of all US Internet
users. And as far back as 2003, the Pew Internet & American Life
Project reported that 4% of US Internet users (approximately 5.5
million people at the time) gambled online daily.

But according to an online poll just released by Harris Interactive,
the percentage of online adults who admit to placing bets online is
relatively small. A whopping 95% of US adults who are online say they
have never spent money playing at an online casino, 94% say they have
never spent money playing online multiplayer poker and 97% say they
have never spent money betting on sports online.

What are the odds of that?

While the survey shows that only a small portion of the online population
regularly gambles online, or at least admits to it, there doesn’t seem to be much interest
in starting up, either.

When asked if they would be likely to play at an online casino
in the next six months, 94% of US adults who are online said they are
not likely to do so. Similarly, 92% said they were not likely to play
online multi-player poker, and 96% were doubtful that they would bet on
sports online.

Asked if online gambling should remain illegal in the US, user
opinions were mixed. Slightly more than half (53%) of US online adults
somewhat or strongly agree it should remain illegal, while 47% somewhat
or strongly disagree.

Much of the unsureness may be attributed to the fact that over
three in
five (64%) US online adults don’t think online gambling can be
effectively regulated. Just one-quarter (26%) of online adults believe
online gaming can be effectively regulated.

One suspects that if online gambling were legal in the US,
online users would have been less hesitant to admit to gambling online,
and the poll numbers would be considerably higher.

More here.