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Guess that Explains Why some people are nuts!!! Not enough oxygen to the brain

Coastal areas lacking the oxygen to support most life forms (hypoxic) are associated with watersheds and populations centers that discharge a lot of nutrients. The number of these dead zones has been doubling roughly every ten years since the 1960s..

You’re traveling through another ecosystem, once filled with fish and clams, but now, bacteria. It’s a journey into a disastrous land with boundaries that are expanding beyond imagination. That’s a signpost up ahead: Your next stop — The Dead Zone.

The number of dead zones, marine areas with so little oxygen that they barely support life, has increased worldwide by a third since 1995, reports a new study in the Aug.15 Science. These areas seriously stress marine ecosystems and deplete stocks of edibles such as fish and clams.

Warming coastal waters and greater demand for corn will probably exacerbate the problem, says Alan Lewitus, chief of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Ecosystem Stressors Research Branch in Silver Spring, Md., which partially funded the study. Restricting the flow of nutrients into waterways is the first step in beginning to resuscitate these zones, but recovery may take years, he says.

Dead zones begin with an abundance of life. Nutrients from fertilizer runoff, sewage discharge or natural upwellings in the water column feed the growth of phytoplankton, tiny free-floating organisms such as some algae.

Via Science news

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