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Pink lights are indiscriminate and will impact all young (and old) with skin issues.

British local councils have a new weapon in their arsenal of devices that collectively and indiscriminately punish teenagers simply for being young. The new tool is a pink overhead light designed to exaggerate acne, with the intention of making children so unhappy and insecure about their appearances that they go somewhere else (mind you, these councils are almost certainly also allocating funds to helping teenagers cope with low self-esteem and avoid the problems associated with it, such as depression and vulnerability of recruitment into violent activity).

Other weapons in the arsenal against youth include the “Mosquito” — an annoying high-pitched tone that adults can’t hear, that shopkeepers and councils have deployed against teens and kids (and, of course, any babies that happen to be in the area), and “anti-kid steps” that are supposed to prevent the menace of kids staying in one place, talking to one another.

The National Youth Agency said it would just move the problem somewhere else. Peta Halls, development officer for the NYA, said: “Anything that aims to embarrass people out of an area is not on.

“The pink lights are indiscriminate in that they will impact on all young people and older people who do not, perhaps, have perfect skin.

“Why waste limited resources on something which moves all young people out of an area? They will move on to somewhere else.

“They have a right to congregate, it’s part of being a teenager and most young people are good, law-abiding people.”
Anti-teenager “pink lights to show up acne”

(Image: BBC)

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