Novelty Seekers Driven By Decreased Ability To Process Dopamine

Novelty Seekers Driven By Decreased Ability To Process Dopamine 

 

For risk-takers and impulsive people, New Year’s resolutions often include being more careful, spending more frugally and cutting back on dangerous behavior, such as drug use. But new research from Vanderbilt finds that these individuals–labeled as novelty seekers by psychologists–face an uphill battle in keeping their New Year’s resolutions due to the way their brains process dopamine. The research reveals that novelty seekers have less of a particular type of dopamine receptor, which may lead them to seek out novel and exciting experiences–such as spending lavishly, taking risks and partying like there’s no tomorrow.

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Smart Cars Are Getting Much Smarter Or At Least Safer

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Well For Me They Need To To Have A Choice Of Two Other Messages That Either Flash “Attention Assist: Drink More Mountain Dew Or Do The Dew!”

We’ve heard of smart cars, but this is getting into a whole new dimension. Mercedes studied the brain waves of sleepy drivers, and matched those up with lackadaisical steering tendencies, resulting in a car that can sense if you’re spacing out.

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Thought of Money will Light Up Your Brain

 Thought of Money will Light Up Your Brain

Dreams of money can seriously affect your thinking

Like the dollar signs in the eyes of cartoon characters, thoughts of money light up visual areas of the brain, a study has found. An international team, led by California University, has found that thoughts of money light up visual areas of the brain, including a part of visual cortex known as “V1” which represents basic features such as edge orientation and color.

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Brain Patterns Translated Into Images By Japanese Researchers

Brain Patterns Translated Into Images By Japanese Researchers 

Science fiction movies have long been obsessed with the as yet unattained ability to project the thoughts of humans (dreams, intentions, etc.) onto a video screen. Now a group of Japanese researchers at the ATR Computational Neuroscience Lab in Kyoto have brought us a lot closer to making that technology real.

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