Study: Snoring Linked to Heart Disease

 Study:  Snoring Linked to Heart Disease

Snoring can cause more than a disrupted night’s sleep – it may trigger high blood pressure which can lead to heart disease or even a stroke.

Researchers at Semmelweis University in Budapest in Hungary have carried out a study and found that loud snoring with breathing pauses is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

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Introducing Microsoft’s Worldwide Telescope

 

Science educator Roy Gould and Microsoft’s Curtis Wong give an astonishing sneak preview of Microsoft’s new WorldWide Telescope — a technology that combines feeds from satellites and telescopes all over the world and the heavens, and weaves them together holistically to build a comprehensive view of our universe.

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Large Sheets of Carbon Nanotubes Produced

Large Sheets of Carbon Nanotubes Produced

Ever since scientists first figured out how to make carbon nanotubes-tiny cylinders of carbon with diameters of a few tens of nanometers-they’ve been touted as the material of the future: as strong as steel but far lighter, with the ability to conduct electricity in useful ways. The problem is that because they’re so small, it’s been difficult to make them at scales that would be useful to industry. You can’t really build a lightweight airplane a few microns at a time, after all.

Now a New Hampshire company, Nanocomp Technologies of Concord, says it has overcome that limitation, producing sheets of carbon nanotubes that measure three feet by six feet and promising slabs 100 square feet in area as soon as this summer.

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Using Janus Particles as Body Submarines

Using Janus Particles as Body Submarines

For the first time, researchers at North Carolina State University have demonstrated that microscopic “two-faced” spheres whose halves are physically or chemically different – so-called Janus particles – will move like stealthy submarines when an alternating electrical field is applied to liquid surrounding the particles.

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Neil Gershenfeld: The Promise of Personal Fabrication

Just when you thought you knew a thing or two about the future, a person like Neil Gershenfeld comes along and makes you feel like you’ve been living in ancient Egypt. This is truly amazing.

In this video MIT professor Neil Gershenfeld talks about his Fab Lab — a low-cost lab that lets people build things they need using digital and analog tools. It’s a simple idea with powerful results: His Fab Labs, set up in communities around the world, let people build eyeglass frames, toys, computer parts – anything they need and can imagine. As Gershenfeld explains, this kind of empowerment leads to education, to problem-solving, to job creation and then to invention, in a truly creative process.

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Fish Woos Mate with Electricity

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Birds do it, bees do it, but this Amazon basin fish do it with ‘lectricity! The nocturnal (and toothless) gymnotiform fish attract the opposite sex and intimidate rivals by amping up their electric field:

One weakly electric fish is the nocturnal gymnotiform fish (Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus), a toothless fish native to the Amazon basin. At night, males of the species give off big, long electric hums, almost like serenades. […]

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A Glowing Protein Shows How We Make Memories

A Glowing Protein Shows How We Make Memories

A new strain of genetically engineered mice has allowed researchers to pinpoint, for the first time, the precise cellular connections that form as a memory is created. By tracing a protein tagged to glow fluorescent green as it migrates through individual neurons, from the cell body out through the branching dendrites, the researchers could see exactly which synapses–connections to other neurons–were involved when the mice learned to fear an electric shock.

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NASA’s New Radar Maps of the Moon

NASA’s New Radar Maps of the Moon

NASA has obtained new high-resolution radar maps of the Moon’s south pole–a region the space agency is considering as a landing site when astronauts return to the Moon in the years ahead.

“We now know the south pole has peaks as high as Mt. McKinley and crater floors four times deeper than the Grand Canyon,” says Doug Cooke, deputy associate administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. “These data will be an invaluable tool for advance planning of lunar missions.”

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The Amazing Hoverbike

 

 

 

 

The “Hoverbike”, created by Jim Chalmers, is in it’s own league and will most likely bring a whole new spectrum of “bike” gangs into the streets.


Travelling at up to 50 Mph and available in electric and gasoline powered engines, this revolutionary form of transportation will have you hovering off into the sunset.
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