Li Wei – Crazy Artist, Brilliant Art

Li Wei - Crazy Artist, Brilliant Art

Li Wei, a short and stocky man, clambered up a metal ladder ten feet, sticking his head deep into a hole in the wall. Two somber assistants using wire pulleys clipped mountaineering carabiners to his waist and feet, causing him to dangle horizontally, his hovering body a metaphor for pre-Olympic China-headless, suspended, and hurtling towards an unknown future. (Pics)

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Art Circles In The Sand

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Extreme Sand Art

Most visitors to a beach are happy just writing their name in the sand.

But a coastal walk 12 years ago led Jim Denevan to a career in sand art that has seen him sculpt spectacular images on beaches and desert floors.

Among his creations is a 5km (three-mile) long spiral design in the Black Rock salt plain of Nevada.

The 47-year-old walked more than 160km (100 miles) to scrape his perfectly geometric shapes on to the desert floor using just garden tools and wooden sticks. The design took nine days to complete.

Mr Denevan, a surfer from California, said he sees the similarities between his art and crop circles in fields.

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Reverse Graffiti Artist Documentary

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Reverse Graffiti or Atomic Explosion?

A few months ago, “reverse graffiti” artist Moose traveled to San Francisco where he created a lovely mural by cleaning grime from the walls of San Francisco’s Broadway Tunnel. Moose calls himself a “professor of dirt.” Documentary filmmaker Doug Pray (Scratch, Hype!, etc.) made a short film about the artwork.

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Modeling Hyberbolic Space – via Crochet

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The simplest way to understand hyperbolic space is to think of a lettuce leaf. It’s a two-dimensional surface on which the curvature is bunched up in such a way that it puts a twist on flat Euclidean geometry. For years, mathematicians had a difficult time modeling the space visually until the late 1990s when Daina Taimina, a mathematician at Cornell, discovered that the complex shapes could be reproduced through crochet.

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