Babies Born One Week Early Are at Higher Risk for Serious Health Problems

art_baby_gi

Babies born at 39 weeks may need extra help in the classroom than those born at 40 weeks.

Babies born only a week early are at higher risk of a host of serious health problems from autism to deafness, research has shown.  A study of hundreds of thousands of British schoolchildren found that those born at 39 weeks are more likely to need extra help in the classroom than those delivered after a full 40 weeks in the womb.

 

Continue reading… “Babies Born One Week Early Are at Higher Risk for Serious Health Problems”

0

Technology that Opens a Window into Babies’ Developing Brains

baby brain

 A new setup at the University of Washington combines a cap to monitor head position (top) and the Magnetoencephalography (MEG) (bottom) lets researchers use it on infants and young children.

A maelstrom of neural connections develop in a child’s brain during the first five years of life. Understanding how interconnected circuits develop, and how babies think, could lead to a host of new insights into everything from autism to language acquisition. But gathering such information has been tricky: infants can’t be ordered to stay motionless, which is required for most advanced neuroimaging techniques. Now a system that works in concert with existing imaging machinery can account for head movement and, for the first time, let researchers see detailed activity in an active baby’s brain.

 

Continue reading… “Technology that Opens a Window into Babies’ Developing Brains”

0

Mother Explains Why She Gives Pot To Her 9-Year-Old Autistic Son

Marijuana Medical seal

Marie Myung-Ok Lee wrote a great piece for Slate about giving cannabis to her 9-year-old autistic son.

Last summer, we reached the six-month mark in our cannabis experiment. We’d been using medical marijuana to help quell our autistic son’s gut pain and anxiety, and we were seeing some huge changes in his behavior and, presumably, his happiness…

Continue reading… “Mother Explains Why She Gives Pot To Her 9-Year-Old Autistic Son”

0

Psychopaths’ Brains Wired to Seek Rewards, No Matter the Consequences

100314150924-large

Abnormalities in how the nucleus accumbens, highlighted here, processes dopamine have been found in individuals with psychopathic traits and may be linked to violent, criminal behavior.

The brains of psychopaths appear to be wired to keep seeking a reward at any cost, new research from Vanderbilt University finds. The research uncovers the role of the brain’s reward system in psychopathy and opens a new area of study for understanding what drives these individuals.

Continue reading… “Psychopaths’ Brains Wired to Seek Rewards, No Matter the Consequences”

0

Nasal Spray May Help Boost Social Skills In Autistic Patients

autisum 

A natural hormone boosts social skills for autistic patients

A nasal spray containing the hormone linked to bonding helps people with autism become more sociable and trusting, scientists have found.   Participants in a study, who inhaled the spray containing oxytocin, were able to interact more easily with others.

 

Continue reading… “Nasal Spray May Help Boost Social Skills In Autistic Patients”

0

Autistics Better At Problem-solving, Study Finds

 090616121339.jpg

Participants were asked to complete patterns in the Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices (RSPM) — a test that measures hypothesis-testing

Autistics are up to 40 percent faster at problem-solving than non-autistics, according to a new Université de Montréal and Harvard University study published in the journal Human Brain Mapping. As part of the investigation, participants were asked to complete patterns in the Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices (RSPM) – test that measures hypothesis-testing, problem-solving and learning skills.

Continue reading… “Autistics Better At Problem-solving, Study Finds”

0

Derek Paravicini: The Musical Genius

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kwjDLHX92w&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

 

Born 3-and-a-half months prematurely, Derek Paravicini was so small that his doctor presumed that he was dead. Just as his mother had given up hope, she heard the faintest whimper. To keep him alive, he was put on oxygen but improper equipment left him blind and autistic. At the tender age of 2 years old, Derek discovered the piano, and his life was never the same.

Fast forward 30 years. Derek couldn’t tell his left from right and could barely count to ten but his brain is a perfectly programmed musical computer.

(parts 2-5 of video after jump…)

Continue reading… “Derek Paravicini: The Musical Genius”

0

Genetic Basis Of Musical Aptitude

090526093925-large.jpg

 

Neurobiology Of Musicality Related To Intrinsic Attachment Behavior

Music is social communication between individuals — humming of lullabies attach infant to parent and singing or playing music adds croup cohesion.The neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment behavior, suggests a recent Finnish study. The study gives new information about genetic background of musical aptitude.

Continue reading… “Genetic Basis Of Musical Aptitude”

0