E. Coli Infection Linked to Long-Term Health Problems

Its here to stay, so why not merchandise!

People who contract gastroenteritis from drinking water contaminated with E. coli are at an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, kidney problems and heart disease in later life, finds a study published on the British Medical Journal website.

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Modeling Autism in a Lab Dish…

A striking resemblance to Jim Carrey… Or is it?

A collaborative effort between researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and the University of California, San Diego, successfully used human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from patients with Rett syndrome to replicate autism in the lab and study the molecular pathogenesis of the disease.

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New Method to Grow Arteries Could Lead to ‘Biological Bypass’ for Heart Disease

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Researchers are reporting a new method of growing arteries could lead to a “biological bypass” — or a non-invasive way to treat coronary artery disease.

A new method of growing arteries could lead to a “biological bypass” — or a non-invasive way to treat coronary artery disease, Yale School of Medicine researchers report with their colleagues in the April issue of Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Babies, Even When Premature, ‘See’ With Their Hands

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A premature baby holding a cylinder

Even premature babies at 33 weeks post-conceptional age, about 2 months before term (40 gestational weeks), are capable of recognizing and distinguishing two objects of different shapes (a prism and a cylinder) with their right or left hands. This is the first demonstration of fully efficient manual perception in preterm human infants.

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Dolphins’ Health Shed Light on Human and Ocean Health

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The Georgia Dolphin Health Assessment capture-release study provides information on the health of the wild dolphin population that inhabits estuaries along the Georgia coast.

A panel of governmental, academic and non-profit scientists speaking at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) unveiled research suggesting that diseases found in dolphins are similar to human diseases and can provide clues into how human health might be affected by exposure to contaminated coastal water or seafood.

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Why Humans Outlive Apes: Human Genes Have Adapted to Inflammation, but We Are More Susceptible to Diseases of Aging

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A baby chimp (Pan troglodytes) and his handler looking at each other.

In spite of their genetic similarity to humans, chimpanzees and great apes have maximum lifespans that rarely exceed 50 years. The difference, explains USC Davis School of Gerontology Professor Caleb Finch, is that as humans evolved genes that enabled them to better adjust to levels of infection and inflammation and to the high cholesterol levels of their meat rich diets.

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Second-hand Smoking Results In Liver Disease, Study Finds

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The image shows sections though livers of mice. Mice exposed to second-hand smoke in the lab accumulated excess fat in their liver cells.

A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside has found that even second-hand tobacco smoke exposure can result in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a common disease and rising cause of chronic liver injury in which fat accumulates in the liver of people who drink little or no alcohol. Continue reading… “Second-hand Smoking Results In Liver Disease, Study Finds”

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How Obesity Increases The Risk For Diabetes

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 fat guy in a little coat

Obesity is probably the most important factor in the development of insulin resistance, but science’s understanding of the chain of events is still spotty. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have filled in the gap and identified the missing link between the two. Their findings, to be published in the June 21, 2009 advance online edition of the journal Nature, explain how obesity sets the stage for diabetes and why thin people can become insulin-resistant.

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