High-tech Recycling Bins Will Tell on Residents Who Don’t Recycle…. and Fine Them For It

Smart-Recycling-Bin-2

RFID chips will allow city workers to monitor how often residents roll carts to the curb for collection.

We’ve heard the promise: in the future, everything’s connected. But when Cleveland rolls out its new RFID-enabled recycling bins next year, ones that know if you’re using them and report you if you’re not, you might long to disconnect.

 

Continue reading… “High-tech Recycling Bins Will Tell on Residents Who Don’t Recycle…. and Fine Them For It”

America’s Most Stressful Cities

Chicago 488

For the 2nd year running, the winner is Chicago

Sinking property values, high unemployment and prices, and poor environments add to the pressure felt by residents in these metros.
Few enjoy their commute. Just ask Stephen Dinwiddie, M.D., a psychiatrist at the University of Chicago.
“I think anybody who, like I do, commutes on the Kennedy on a daily basis knows exactly what stress is,” he says, of his daily home-to-work commute on Chicago’s expressway that extends from the Chicago Loop to O’Hare International Airport. “It takes anywhere from 30 minutes to several centuries–at least subjectively.”
But more pressing factors make Chicago for the second year in a row the country’s most stressful city. Crowding, poor air quality, a high 11% unemployment rate and free-falling home values have created a cocktail of constant worry affecting many in the Windy City.
Los Angeles, Calif., ranks second, followed by New York, N.Y., Cleveland, Ohio, and Providence, R.I.
Behind the Numbers
To find the country’s most stressful cities, we examined quality of life factors in the country’s 40 largest metropolitan statistical areas, or metros–geographic entities defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget for use by federal agencies in collecting, tabulating and publishing federal statistics. We looked at June 2009 unemployment figures provided by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics and cost of living figures from the Council for Community and Economic Research. We examined median home-price drops from Q1 2008 to Q1 2009 that were provided by the National Association of Realtors. Population density based on 2008 data from the U.S. Census Bureau and ESRI also factored. Last, we examined the number of sunny and partly sunny days per year, based on 2007 data from the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service, as well as air-quality figures, based on 2007 data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Sinking property values, high unemployment and prices, and poor environments add to the pressure felt by residents in these metros.

Continue reading… “America’s Most Stressful Cities”