Male-Pattern Baldness An Indicator Of Heart And Prostate Disease In Men

Male-Pattern Baldness An Indicator Of Heart And Prostate Disease In Men 

Male-pattern baldness increases risk of heart and prostate disease

When considering men’s health there is good evidence to suggest that baldness may be an indicator of both heart and prostate disease.  When compared to men with no hair loss at all, the risk of heart disease increased by 9 percent.  When a bald spot appears on the crown, relative risk jumps to 23 percent.  When all hair is gone from the top of the head, the risk rises by a worrisome 36 percent (Info from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School).  According to Australian researcher, men with bold spots at the top of their heads were 1 ½ times more likely to have moderate to high-grade prostate cancer before age 70 than those without such bald spots. 

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World’s First Transgenic Dog Is A Fluorescent Puppy

World’s First Transgenic Dog Is Fluorescent Puppy

Ruppy the transgenic puppy at 10 days old under ultraviolet light 

A cloned beagle named Ruppy – short for Ruby Puppy – is the world’s first transgenic dog. She and four other beagles all produce a fluorescent protein that glows red under ultraviolet light. (Pics)

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Repairing Lungs Outside The Body

Repairing Lungs Outside The Body

Lung tissue is preserved in the Toronto XVIVO Lung Perfusion System with the aim of repairing lungs prior to transplant.  

Lung transplant offers hope of a longer life for patients with end-stage respiratory diseases such as emphysema and cystic fibrosis, with some surviving for years following surgery. But due to chronic shortages of viable organs for transplant, only about 25 percent of patients on waiting lists receive new lungs. However, a new out-of-body lung-repair technique developed at the Toronto General Hospital may dramatically increase the number of lungs that can be used in transplants and improve surgical outcome.

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GPS Enabled Asthma Inhaler To Track Asthma Attacks

GPS Enabled Asthma Inhaler To Track Asthma Attacks

Inhalers make way for GPS 

Thanks to David Van Sickle, we’ll soon be able to track (and hopefully eliminate) recurring asthma attack outbreaks. Sickle, a scholar in the Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is working with students in the biomedical engineering program to create an asthma inhaler with a built-in GPS receiver.

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FDA Approves Eye Implant For Macular Degeneration

FDA Approves Eye Implant For Macular Degeneration

Implantable telescope for end-stage macular degeneration 

An advanced prosthesis developed by VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies, for patients surfing with severe macular degeneration, has received a confirmatory approval from the FDA. This implantable telescope could be a new hope in vision restoration of patients on the receiving end from end-stage macular degeneration.

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British Scientists Could Become First To Create Synthetic Human Blood

British Scientists Could Become First To Create Synthetic Human Blood

Scientists want to create blood from embryonic stem cells 

British scientists are on course to become the first to create synthetic human blood from embryonic stem cells, it emerged today.

The ground-breaking project could provide an unlimited supply of blood for emergency transfusions free of the risk of infection.

Because stem cells multiply indefinitely, it would be possible to enormous quantities, researchers said..

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Electrical Stimulation Through The Spinal Cord May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms

Electrical Stimulation Through The Spinal Cord May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms

Neural activity in the brain of a Parkinsonian rat before (top) and after (bottom) electrical stimulation is applied to its spinal cord.  

Delivering electrical stimulation to the spinal cord through tiny, platinum electrodes could ease the severe motor deficits of Parkinson’s disease as effectively as a much more intrusive procedure currently in clinical use, according to a new study in rodents. If the findings are confirmed in humans, scientists say, the procedure could dramatically improve treatment for the disease by making electrical therapies safer and more broadly available.

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