E. Coli Infection Linked to Long-Term Health Problems

Its here to stay, so why not merchandise!

People who contract gastroenteritis from drinking water contaminated with E. coli are at an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, kidney problems and heart disease in later life, finds a study published on the British Medical Journal website.

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Mechanism Behind Organ Transplant Rejection Identified

Heart-transplant blood vessel in chronic rejection

UCLA researchers have pinpointed the culprit behind chronic rejection of heart, lung and kidney transplants. Published in the Nov. 23 edition of Science Signaling, their findings suggest new therapeutic approaches for preventing transplant rejection and sabotaging cancer growth.

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Gene Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma?

DO NOT DRINK… Trust me, i know what its made of!

A potent anti-tumor gene introduced into mice with metastatic melanoma has resulted in permanent immune reconfiguration and produced a complete remission of their cancer, according to an article to be published in the December 2010 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Whisker Stimulation Prevents Strokes in Rats; Stimulating Fingers, Lips and Face May Also Work in Humans

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UCI researchers found that mechanically stroking a single whisker activated a rat’s cerebral cortex – seen lighting up in magenta and blue – and prompted obstructed blood to take other routes to the brain.

Talk about surviving by a whisker. The most common type of stroke can be completely prevented in rats by stimulating a single whisker, according to a new study by UC Irvine researchers.

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Mouse With Human Liver: New Model for Treatment of Liver Disease

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Mice whose own liver cells have been replaced with human hepatocytes (shown in green) can be successfully infected with hepatitis B virus (shown in red) providing a new way to test novel therapies for debilitating human liver diseases.

How do you study-and try to cure in the laboratory-an infection that only humans can get? A team led by Salk Institute researchers does it by generating a mouse with an almost completely human liver. This “humanized” mouse is susceptible to human liver infections and responds to human drug treatments, providing a new way to test novel therapies for debilitating human liver diseases and other diseases with liver involvement such as malaria.

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Some Morbidly Obese People Are Missing Genes, Shows New Research

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A small but significant proportion of morbidly obese people are missing a section of their DNA, according to new research.

A small but significant proportion of morbidly obese people are missing a section of their DNA, according to research published February 3 in Nature. The authors of the study, from Imperial College London and ten other European Centres, say that missing DNA such as that identified in this research may be having a dramatic effect on some people’s weight.

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Even Small Dietary Reductions in Salt Could Mean Fewer Heart Attacks, Strokes and Deaths

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New research suggests reducing salt in the American diet by as little as one-half teaspoon (or three grams) per day could prevent nearly 100,000 heart attacks and 92,000 deaths each year.

Reducing salt in the American diet by as little as one-half teaspoon (or three grams) per day could prevent nearly 100,000 heart attacks and 92,000 deaths each year, according to a new study. Such benefits are on par with the benefits from reductions in smoking and could save the United States about $24 billion in healthcare costs, the researchers add.

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Ancient Egyptian Cosmetics: ‘Magical’ Makeup May Have Been Medicine for Eye Disease

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Queen Nefertiti and other ancient Egyptian women may have worn heavy makeup to protect against eye infections that were a constant threat in the time of the pharaohs.

There’s more to the eye makeup that gave Queen Nefertiti and other ancient Egyptian royals those stupendous gazes and legendary beauty than meets the eye. Scientists in France are reporting that the alluring eye makeup also may have been used to help prevent or treat eye disease by doubling as an infection-fighter.

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Long-Term Physical Activity Has an Anti-Aging Effect at the Cellular Level

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New research shows that physical exercise by professional athletes leads to activation of the important enzyme telomerase and stabilizes the telomere

Intensive exercise prevented shortening of telomeres, a protective effect against aging of the cardiovascular system, according to research reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Some Germs Are Good for You: Surface Bacteria Maintain Skin’s Healthy Balance

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Bacteria growing in a cell culture.

On the skin’s surface, bacteria are abundant, diverse and constant, but inflammation is undesirable. Research at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine now shows that the normal bacteria living on the skin surface trigger a pathway that prevents excessive inflammation after injury.

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When Is A Fetus Able To Survive Outside The Womb?

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When a fetus is smaller than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy, due to associated problems like a poorly developed heart, health concerns as severe as brain damage can result.

When a fetus is smaller than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy, due to associated problems like a poorly developed heart, health concerns as severe as brain damage can result.

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