Oldest Fossilized Shrimp in the world found!

Geologists study rare well-preserved creature showing muscles

Rodney Feldmann, professor emeritus, and Carrie Schweitzer, associate professor, from Kent State University’s Department of Geology report on the oldest fossil shrimp known to date in the world. The creature in stone is as much as 360 million years old and was found in Oklahoma. Even the muscles of the fossil are preserved.

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Neanderthals Were More Promiscuous Than Modern Humans?

Also great with spears. These were days when you did NOT make your wife mad!

Fossil finger bones of early human ancestors suggest that Neanderthals were more promiscuous than human populations today, researchers at the universities of Liverpool and Oxford have found.

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Giant Plankton-Eating Fishes Roamed Prehistoric Seas, Fossil Evidence Shows

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Illustration of Bonnericthys

Giant plankton-eating fishes roamed the prehistoric seas for over 100 million years before they were wiped out in the same event that killed off the dinosaurs, new fossil evidence has shown.

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Ancient Koalas May Have Been Loud and Lazy but They Didn’t Chew Gum

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Lowland mid Tertiary rainforest of Queensland, Australia, including archaic koalas that reveal evidence about the origin of their distinctive vocalizations.

Skull fragments of prehistoric koalas from the Riversleigh rainforests of millions of year ago suggest they shared the modern koala’s “lazy” lifestyle and ability to produce loud “bellowing” calls to attract mates and provide warnings about predators.

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Warm-blooded Dinosaurs Worked Up A Sweat

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Schematic diagram to show how the mechanical advantage and active muscle volume in the dinosaur hind limb were reconstructed.

Were dinosaurs “warm-blooded” like present-day mammals and birds, or “cold-blooded” like present day lizards? The implications of this simple-sounding question go beyond deciding whether or not you’d snuggle up to a dinosaur on a cold winter’s evening.

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Getting A Leg Up On Whale And Dolphin Evolution: New Comprehensive Analysis Sheds Light On The Origin Of Cetaceans

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The Eocene “walking whale”(Ambulocetus natans) is a close relative to the Cetacean.

When the ancestors of living cetaceans—whales, dolphins and porpoises—first dipped their toes into water, a series of evolutionary changes were sparked that ultimately nestled these swimming mammals into the larger hoofed animal group. But what happened first, a change from a plant-based diet to a carnivorous diet, or the loss of their ability to walk?

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Fossilized Dung Balls Reveal Secret Ecology Of Lost World

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Palaeontologists in Argentina have discovered that dung balls reveal much about the ecology of a lost world of giant mammals that lived 30 million years ago.

A new study of 30-million-year-old-fossil ‘mega-dung’ from extinct giant South American mammals, published in Palaeontology, reveals evidence of complex ecological interactions and theft of dung-beetles’ food stores by other animals.

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Mammoths Survived In Britain Until 14,000 Years Ago, New Discovery Suggests

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 woolly mammoth

Research which finally proves that bones found in Shropshire, England provide the most geologically recent evidence of woolly mammoths in North Western Europe publishes June 17 in the Geological Journal. Analysis of both the bones and the surrounding environment suggests that some mammoths remained part of British wildlife long after they are conventionally believed to have become extinct.

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