New Explanation for the Origin of High Species Diversity in Amazon

New research shows that Amazonian diversity has evolved

An international team of scientists, including a leading evolutionary biologist from the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, have reset the agenda for future research in the highly diverse Amazon region by showing that the extraordinary diversity found there is much older than generally thought.

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Sharks and Wolves: Prey Interactions Similar on Land and in Oceans

major predators help control the populations of their prey… (but not people)

There may be many similarities between the importance of large predators in marine and terrestrial environments, researchers concluded in a recent study, which examined the interactions between wolves and elk in the United States, as well as sharks and dugongs in Australia.

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Female Fruit Flies Can Be ‘Too Attractive’ to Males, Scientists Show

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These are fruit flies courting.

Females can be too attractive to the opposite sex — too attractive for their own good — say biologists at UC Santa Barbara. They found that, among fruit flies, too much male attention directed toward attractive females leads to smaller families and, ultimately, to a reduced rate of population-wide adaptive evolution.

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Loyal Alligators Display Mating Habits Of Birds

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New studies show that alligators display the same loyalty to their mating partners as birds.

Alligators display the same loyalty to their mating partners as birds reveals a study published today in Molecular Ecology. The ten-year-study by scientists from the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory reveals that up to 70% of females chose to remain with their partner, often for many years.

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Loss Of Top Predators Causing Surge In Smaller Predators, Ecosystem Collapse

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In this image, the extermination of wolves may allow coyote populations to surge, which in turn can suppress feral cat populations, leading to more rodents, etc.

The catastrophic decline around the world of “apex” predators such as wolves, cougars, lions or sharks has led to a huge increase in smaller “mesopredators” that are causing major economic and ecological disruptions, a new study concludes.

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For Carnivorous Plants, Slow But Steady Wins The Race

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Fly caught inside a Venus fly trap.

Like the man-eating plant in Little Shop of Horrors, carnivorous plants rely on animal prey for sustenance. Fortunately for humans, carnivorous plants found in nature are not dependent on a diet of human blood but rather are satisfied with the occasional fly or other insect. The existence of carnivorous plants has fascinated botanists and non-botanists alike for centuries and raises the question, “Why are some plants carnivorous?”

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Fossilized Dung Balls Reveal Secret Ecology Of Lost World

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Palaeontologists in Argentina have discovered that dung balls reveal much about the ecology of a lost world of giant mammals that lived 30 million years ago.

A new study of 30-million-year-old-fossil ‘mega-dung’ from extinct giant South American mammals, published in Palaeontology, reveals evidence of complex ecological interactions and theft of dung-beetles’ food stores by other animals.

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Disappearing Seagrass Threatening Future Of Coastal Ecosystems Globally

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New research shows that 58 percent of world’s seagrass meadows are currently declining.

An international team of scientists warns that accelerating losses of seagrasses across the globe threaten the immediate health and long-term sustainability of coastal ecosystems. The team has compiled and analyzed the first comprehensive global assessment of seagrass observations and found that 58 percent of world’s seagrass meadows are currently declining.

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Not One, But Two Kinds Of Males Found In Invasive Round Goby Fish

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Round goby fish

Scientists have found the existence of two types of males of a fiercely invasive fish spreading through the Great Lakes, which may provide answers as to how they rapidly reproduce.

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