New Brain Connections Form Rapidly During Motor Learning

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New connections begin to form between brain cells almost immediately as animals learn a new task, according to a new study.

New connections begin to form between brain cells almost immediately as animals learn a new task, according to a study published recently in Nature. Led by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, the study involved detailed observations of the rewiring processes that take place in the brain during motor learning.

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Vast Right Arm Conspiracy? Study Suggests Handedness May Affect Body Perception

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Body maps in our brain may influence how we perceive our physical bodies — for example, if there is a lot of brain area associated with our right arm, we will view it being as longer compared to our left arm.

There are areas in the brain devoted to our arms, legs, and various parts of our bodies. The way these areas are distributed throughout the brain are known as “body maps” and there are some significant differences in these maps between left- and right-handed people. For example, in left-handed people, there is an equal amount of brain area devoted to the left and right arms in both hemispheres. However, for right-handed people, there is more cortical area associated with right arm than the left.

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Protection Or Peril? Gun Possession Of Questionable Value In An Assault, Study Finds

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A new study estimates that people with a gun are 4.5 times more likely to be shot in an assault than those not possessing a gun.

In a first-of its-kind study, epidemiologists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found that, on average, guns did not protect those who possessed them from being shot in an assault. The study estimated that people with a gun were 4.5 times more likely to be shot in an assault than those not possessing a gun.

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Light, Photosynthesis Help Bacteria Invade Fresh Produce

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Male common fruit fly (Drosophila Melanogaster). A common household nuisance, the fruit fly, is capable of intricate social learning much like that used by humans.

A common household nuisance, the fruit fly, is capable of intricate social learning much like that used by humans, according to new research from McMaster University.

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One-finger Exercise Reveals Unexpected Limits To Dexterity

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Adult volunteers wearing a close-fitting Teflon cover on their forefingers applied fingertip pressure on a slippery Teflon surface linked to a force-measuring sensor.

“Push your finger as hard as you can against the surface. Now as hard as you can but move it slowly – follow the ticking clock. Now faster. Now faster.” Continue reading… “One-finger Exercise Reveals Unexpected Limits To Dexterity”

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Finding Fear: Neuroscientists Locate Where It Is Stored In The Brain

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For the first time, neuroscientists have located the neurons responsible for fear conditioning in the mammalian brain

Fear is a powerful emotion, and neuroscientists have for the first time located the neurons responsible for fear conditioning in the mammalian brain. Fear conditioning is a form of Pavlovian, or associative, learning and is considered to be a model system for understanding human phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders.

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Need Something? Talk To My Right Ear

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We humans prefer to be addressed in our right ear.

We humans prefer to be addressed in our right ear and are more likely to perform a task when we receive the request in our right ear rather than our left. In a series of three studies, looking at ear preference in communication between humans, Dr. Luca Tommasi and Daniele Marzoli from the University “Gabriele d’Annunzio” in Chieti, Italy, show that a natural side bias, depending on hemispheric asymmetry in the brain, manifests itself in everyday human behavior.

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