Critically Endangered Tree Frog Bred for First Time

An adult La loma tree frog (Hyloscirtus colymba) Now you know!

As frogs around the world continue to disappear — many killed by a rapidly spreading disease called chytridiomycosis, which attacks the skin cells of amphibians — one critically endangered species has received an encouraging boost.

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Wild Cat Found Mimicking Monkey Calls; Predatory Trickery Documented for the First Time in Wild Felids in Americas

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Marguay

In a fascinating example of vocal mimicry, researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and UFAM (Federal University of Amazonas) have documented a wild cat species imitating the call of its intended victim: a small, squirrel-sized monkey known as a pied tamarin. This is the first recorded instance of a wild cat species in the Americas mimicking the calls of its prey.

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Giant Panda Genome Reveals New Insights Into the Bear’s Bamboo Diet

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A panda eats a large bamboo stalk.

A Chinese-led team including international researchers with a scientist from Cardiff University, has shed new light on some of the giant panda’s unusual biological traits, including its famously restricted diet.

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Long-Distance Migration Shapes Butterfly Wings

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Monarch butterflies that migrate long distances have evolved significantly larger and more elongated wings than their stationary cousins.

A University of Georgia study has found that monarch butterflies that migrate long distances have evolved significantly larger and more elongated wings than their stationary cousins, differences that are consistent with traits known to enhance flight ability in other migratory species.

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New Spider Species Is Largest of Its Type in Middle East

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A new species of spider — Cerbalus aravensis — is the largest of its type in the Middle East, scientists in Israel say.

A new and previously unknown species of spider has been discovered in the dune of the Sands of Samar in the southern Arava region of Israel by a team of scientists from the Department of Biology in the University of Haifa-Oranim. Unfortunately, however, its habitat is endangered.

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Primates’ Social Intelligence Overestimated: Primates Groom Others If Afraid They’d Lose Fight

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Two wild long-tailed macaques in the Sacred Monkey Forest, Ubud, Bali in Indonesia.

The grooming behaviour displayed by primates is due to less rational behaviour than often thought. According to a computer model developed by scientists at the University of Groningen, one basic rule explains all possible grooming patterns: individuals will groom others if they’re afraid they’ll lose from them in a fight.

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Ancient Koalas May Have Been Loud and Lazy but They Didn’t Chew Gum

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Lowland mid Tertiary rainforest of Queensland, Australia, including archaic koalas that reveal evidence about the origin of their distinctive vocalizations.

Skull fragments of prehistoric koalas from the Riversleigh rainforests of millions of year ago suggest they shared the modern koala’s “lazy” lifestyle and ability to produce loud “bellowing” calls to attract mates and provide warnings about predators.

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Why Do Animals, Especially Males, Have So Many Different Colors?

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This male Hetaerina damselfly from the occisa species has red spots at the base and tip of its wings but no black pigmentation.

Why do so many animal species — including fish, birds and insects — display such rich diversity in coloration and other traits? In new research, Gregory Grether, UCLA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and Christopher Anderson, who recently earned his doctorate in Grether’s laboratory, offer an answer.

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HIV’s Ancestors May Have Plagued First Mammals

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Some of the 850 new species discovered in underground water, caves and micro-caverns across outback Australia.

Australian researchers have discovered a huge number of new species of invertebrate animals living in underground water, caves and “micro-caverns” amid the harsh conditions of the Australian outback.

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New Species Discovered In The Greater Mekong At Risk Of Extinction

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Leopard gecko. A bird eating fanged frog, a gecko that looks like it’s from another planet and a bird which would rather walk than fly, are among the 163 new species discovered in the Greater Mekong region last year that are now at risk of extinction

A bird-eating fanged frog, a gecko that looks like it’s from another planet, and a bird which would rather walk than fly — these are among the 163 new species discovered in the Greater Mekong region last year that are now at risk of extinction, says a new report launched by WWF.

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