Critically Endangered Tree Frog Bred for First Time

An adult La loma tree frog (Hyloscirtus colymba) Now you know!

As frogs around the world continue to disappear — many killed by a rapidly spreading disease called chytridiomycosis, which attacks the skin cells of amphibians — one critically endangered species has received an encouraging boost.

Continue reading… “Critically Endangered Tree Frog Bred for First Time”

0

Lizard Moms Choose the Right Genes for the Right Gender Offspring

lizards

The male of this species can be two to three times the mass of the female, but the females seem to be in control of the genetic destiny.

Two Dartmouth biologists have found that brown anole lizards make an interesting choice when deciding which males should father their offspring. The females of this species mate with several males, then produce more sons with sperm from large fathers, and more daughters with sperm from smaller fathers. The researchers believe that the lizards do this to ensure that the genes from large fathers are passed on to sons, who stand to benefit from inheriting the genes for large size.

Continue reading… “Lizard Moms Choose the Right Genes for the Right Gender Offspring”

0

Snake Venom Charms Science World: Novel Protein from King Cobra as Drug Discovery

KingCobra

The King Cobra continues to weave its charm with researchers identifying a protein in its venom with the potential for new drug discovery and to advance understanding of disease mechanisms.

The King Cobra continues to weave its charm with researchers identifying a protein in its venom with the potential for new drug discovery and to advance understanding of disease mechanisms.

Continue reading… “Snake Venom Charms Science World: Novel Protein from King Cobra as Drug Discovery”

0

Pinch Away the Pain: Scorpion Venom Could Be an Alternative to Morphine

100216163341-large

Researchers are investigating new ways for developing a novel painkiller based on natural compounds found in the venom of scorpions.

Scorpion venom is notoriously poisonous — but it might be used as an alternative to dangerous and addictive painkillers like morphine, a Tel Aviv University researcher claims.

Continue reading… “Pinch Away the Pain: Scorpion Venom Could Be an Alternative to Morphine”

0

Evolutionary Game of Rock-Paper-Scissors May Lead to New Species

100218125537

Side-blotched lizards have three color morphs with different mating strategies, but in some populations only one morph occurs.

New research on lizards supports an old idea about how species can originate. Morphologically distinct types are often found within species, and biologists have speculated that these “morphs” could be the raw material for speciation. What were once different types of individuals within the same population could eventually evolve into separate species.

Continue reading… “Evolutionary Game of Rock-Paper-Scissors May Lead to New Species”

0

Amphibians as Environmental Omen Disputed

091111092051-large

Amphibians, for years considered a leading indicator of environmental degradation, are not uniquely susceptible to pollution, according to a meta-analysis to be published in Ecology Letters.

Amphibians, for years considered a leading indicator of environmental degradation, are not uniquely susceptible to pollution, according to a meta-analysis to be published in Ecology Letters.

Continue reading… “Amphibians as Environmental Omen Disputed”

0

Do Three Meals A Day Keep Fungi Away? Protective Effect Of Being Warm-blooded

091015112138-large

Aspergillus sp. of mold on bread. Mycelium and conidia (spores) visible. Live specimen. Wet mount, 40X objective, transmitted brightfield illumination.

The fact that they eat a lot – and often – may explain why most people and other mammals are protected from the majority of fungal pathogens, according to research from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.

Continue reading… “Do Three Meals A Day Keep Fungi Away? Protective Effect Of Being Warm-blooded”

0

Loyal Alligators Display Mating Habits Of Birds

091007081534-large

New studies show that alligators display the same loyalty to their mating partners as birds.

Alligators display the same loyalty to their mating partners as birds reveals a study published today in Molecular Ecology. The ten-year-study by scientists from the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory reveals that up to 70% of females chose to remain with their partner, often for many years.

Continue reading… “Loyal Alligators Display Mating Habits Of Birds”

0

Rediscovering The Dragon’s Paradise Lost: Komodo Dragons Most Likely Evolved In Australia, Dispersed To Indonesia

090929203027-large

The Komodo Dragon is the world’s largest lizard, growing to an average length of 2 to 3 meters. It is found almost entirely on the Indonesian islands of Rinca, Flores and Komodo.

The world’s largest living lizard species, the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), is vulnerable to extinction and yet little is known about its natural history. New research by a team of palaeontologists and archaeologists from Australia, Malaysia and Indonesia, who studied fossil evidence from Australia, Timor, Flores, Java and India, shows that Komodo Dragons most likely evolved in Australia and dispersed westward to Indonesia.

Continue reading… “Rediscovering The Dragon’s Paradise Lost: Komodo Dragons Most Likely Evolved In Australia, Dispersed To Indonesia”

0

Boy Or Girl? In Lizards, Egg Size Matters

 090604124015-large.jpg

Eastern three-lined skink (Bassiana duperreyi

Whether baby lizards will turn out to be male or female is a more complicated question than scientists would have ever guessed, according to a new report published online on June 4th in Current Biology. The study shows that for at least one lizard species, egg size matters.

Continue reading… “Boy Or Girl? In Lizards, Egg Size Matters”

0