Sleep Apnea May Lead to Memory Loss

Sleep Apnea May Lead to Memory Loss

 Bad sleep may be worse than anyone thought

Loud snoring can seriously affect your memory. In what will come as a stern warning for bad sleepers everywhere, scientists have for the first time discovered that people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) suffer tissue loss in brain regions that help store memory.

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Arm and Leg Length Linked to Memory Problems

Arm and Leg Length Linked to Memory Problems

Anthropometry is the study of the dimensions of the human body

Having short arms and legs may raise a person’s risk of developing memory problems later in life, US researchers said on Monday.

They said women with the shortest arm spans were 50% more likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease than women with longer arm spans. And the longer a woman’s leg from floor to knee, the lower her risk for dementia.

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The Glasses With A RECALL Feature

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You know the feeling. Call it a senior moment, absent-mindedness or a sign of what a busy active brain you have. We’ve all asked ourselves that irritating question: “Where on earth did I leave my car keys?”

Now a team of Japanese scientists claim to have come up with the answer. And the secretive artificial intelligence project codenamed Smart Goggle does not stop at elusive keys. With Yasuo Kuniyoshi’s invention balanced on your nose, nothing – be it the remote control, mobile phone or iPod – should ever go missing again.

Simply tell the glasses what you are looking for an it will play into your eye a video of the last few seconds you saw that item.

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Who Have Better Memories: Men or Women?

Who Have Better Memories: Men or Women?

Information about even the tiniest details of our daily lives zooms along neurons in our brains and is processed and saved in some predetermined location. How and what information is stored in the memory is in part dependent on whether an individual is a man or a woman. While the underlying mechanisms that explain memory differences between men and women are largely unknown, the fact that there are differences remains an intriguing and insightful area of scientific study. New evidence, reported last week in the journal Current Directions in Psychological Science, indicates that there exist significant differences between men and women pertaining to a unique type of long-term memory known as episodic memory.

Although there are exceptions, in general, relative to men, women appear to have better long-term episodic memory—memories of events or experiences, such as weddings or accidents, that tend to be verbal in nature, meaning the memories are associated with words, whether heard, spoken, or written.

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