Enigma of Missing Stars in Local Group of Galaxies

‘Missing’ stars in the Andromeda Nebula and our Milky Way?

In the local group of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda Nebula and our Milky Way, there are about 100 billion stars. According to astronomers’ calculations, there should be many more. Now, physicists from the University of Bonn and the University of St. Andrews in Scotland may have found an explanation for this discrepancy.

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WISE Captures a Cosmic Rosebud Blossoming With New Stars

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A new infrared image from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, shows a cosmic rosebud blossoming with new stars.

A new infrared image from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, shows a cosmic rosebud blossoming with new stars. The stars, called the Berkeley 59 cluster, are the blue dots to the right of the image center. They are ripening out of the dust cloud from which they formed, and at just a few million years old, are young on stellar time scales.

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No Place to Hide: Missing Primitive Stars Outside Milky Way Uncovered

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The Fornax dwarf galaxy is one of our Milky Way’s neighbouring dwarf galaxies.

After years of successful concealment, the most primitive stars outside our Milky Way galaxy have finally been unmasked. New observations using ESO’s Very Large Telescope have been used to solve an important astrophysical puzzle concerning the oldest stars in our galactic neighbourhood — which is crucial for our understanding of the earliest stars in the Universe.

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Stunning New Image of Cat’s Paw Nebula

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The Cat’s Paw Nebula (NGC 6334) is a vast region of star formation. The whole gas cloud is about 50 light-years across.

ESO has just released a stunning new image of the vast cloud known as the Cat’s Paw Nebula or NGC 6334. This complex region of gas and dust, where numerous massive stars are born, lies near the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, and is heavily obscured by intervening dust clouds.

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Close-Up Movie Shows Hidden Details in the Birth of Super-Suns

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Artist’s conception of the “boiling disk” surrounding the massive young stellar object known as Orion Source I. A disk of hot, ionized gas surrounds the central star, blocking our view

The constellation of Orion is a hotbed of massive star formation, most prominently in the Great Nebula that sits in Orion’s sword. The glowing gas of the Nebula is powered by a group of young massive stars, but behind it is a cluster of younger stars and clumps of gas. Still gathering together under gravity’s pull, these gas clumps will eventually ignite into stars.

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Exoplanets Clue To Sun’s Curious Chemistry

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Artist’s impression of a baby star still surrounded by a protoplanetary disc in which planets are forming.

A ground-breaking census of 500 stars, 70 of which are known to host planets, has successfully linked the long-standing “lithium mystery” observed in the Sun to the presence of planetary systems. Using ESO’s successful HARPS spectrograph, a team of astronomers has found that sun-like stars that host planets have destroyed their lithium much more efficiently than “planet-free” stars.

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Milky Way’s Tiny But Tough Galactic Neighbor

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Astronomers obtained this portrait of Barnard’s Galaxy using the Wide Field Imager attached to the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile.

A stunning new image reveals one of our nearest galactic neighbors, Barnard’s Galaxy, also known as NGC 6822. The galaxy contains regions of rich star formation and curious nebulae, such as the bubble clearly visible in the upper left of this remarkable vista. The strange shapes of these cosmic misfits help researchers understand how galaxies interact, evolve and occasionally “cannibalize” each other, leaving behind radiant, star-filled scraps.

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Dirty Stars Make Good Solar System Hosts

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Pebble density increases with time. The black regions have no pebbles, blue regions have a moderate density, and bright regions have high density of pebbles. The square represents a small part of the disk of gas and dust that surrounds the star before the planets form, referred to as the protoplanetary disk, seen from above.

Some stars are lonely behemoths, with no surrounding planets or asteroids, while others sport a skirt of attendant planetary bodies. New research published this week in The Astrophysical Journal Letters explains why the composition of the stars often indicates whether their light shines into deep space, or whether a small fraction shines onto orbiting planets.

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Venus Express Adds Evidence For Atmospheric Water Loss On Earth’s Twin

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Global view of Venus in a combination of ultraviolet VMC and infrared VIRTIS images.

Observations by the European Space Agency’s Venus Express mission have provided strong new evidence that the solar wind has stripped away significant quantities of water from Earth’s twin planet. The data also shed new light on the transfer of trace gases in the Venusian atmosphere and wind patterns. Continue reading… “Venus Express Adds Evidence For Atmospheric Water Loss On Earth’s Twin”

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Oddball Stars Explained: New Observations Solve Longstanding Mystery Of Tipped Stars

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stars now explained. New observations on the double star system.

A pair of unusual stars known as DI Herculis has confounded astronomers for three decades, but new observations by MIT researchers and their colleagues have provided data that they say solve the mystery once and for all.

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Trifid Nebula: A Massive Star Factory

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The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera

A new image of the Trifid Nebula, shows just why it is a firm favorite of astronomers, amateur and professional alike. This massive star factory is so named for the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, and is a rare combination of three nebula types, revealing the fury of freshly formed stars and presaging more star birth.

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New Portrait Of Omega Nebula’s Glistening Watercolors

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Three-colour composite image of the Omega Nebula

The Omega Nebula, sometimes called the Swan Nebula, is a dazzling stellar nursery located about 5500 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). An active star-forming region of gas and dust about 15 light-years across, the nebula has recently spawned a cluster of massive, hot stars. The intense light and strong winds from these hulking infants have carved remarkable filigree structures in the gas and dust.

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