Bat Echolocation: 3-D Imaging Differentiates How Various Bats Generate Biosonar Signals

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The Bat can generate and use Biosonar Signals.

Researchers at The University of Western Ontario (Western) led an international and multi-disciplinary study that sheds new light on the way that bats echolocate. With echolocation, animals emit sounds and then listen to the reflected echoes of those sounds to form images of their surroundings in their brains.

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Scientists Identify Ecuador’s Yasuni National Park as One of Most Biodiverse Places on Earth

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Crowned like a king, the spike-headed katydid, Panacanthus cuspidatus, is one of projected 100,000 insect species in Yasuni.

A team of scientists has documented that Yasuní National Park, in the core of the Ecuadorian Amazon, shatters world records for a wide array of plant and animal groups, from amphibians to trees to insects.

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Punishment Important in Plant-Pollinator Relationship

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Charlotte Jander placed either a wasp carrying pollen or a pollen-free wasp in a bag around a fig fruit.

Figs and the wasps that pollinate them present one of biologists’ favorite examples of a beneficial relationship between two different species. In exchange for the pollination service provided by the wasp, the fig fruit provides room and board for the wasp’s developing young. However, wasps do not always pollinate the fig. Fig trees “punish” these “cheaters” by dropping unpollinated fruit, killing the wasp’s offspring inside, report researchers working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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New Spider Species Is Largest of Its Type in Middle East

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A new species of spider — Cerbalus aravensis — is the largest of its type in the Middle East, scientists in Israel say.

A new and previously unknown species of spider has been discovered in the dune of the Sands of Samar in the southern Arava region of Israel by a team of scientists from the Department of Biology in the University of Haifa-Oranim. Unfortunately, however, its habitat is endangered.

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Ancient Koalas May Have Been Loud and Lazy but They Didn’t Chew Gum

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Lowland mid Tertiary rainforest of Queensland, Australia, including archaic koalas that reveal evidence about the origin of their distinctive vocalizations.

Skull fragments of prehistoric koalas from the Riversleigh rainforests of millions of year ago suggest they shared the modern koala’s “lazy” lifestyle and ability to produce loud “bellowing” calls to attract mates and provide warnings about predators.

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Cousins of Prehistoric Supercrocodile Inhabit Lost World of Sahara

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Paleontologist Paul Sereno with his Saharan discoveries — SuperCroc, BoarCroc (upper right), PancakeCroc (lower right), RatCroc, DogCroc and DuckCroc.

A suite of five ancient crocs, including one with teeth like boar tusks and another with a snout like a duck’s bill, have been discovered in the Sahara by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Paul Sereno. The five fossil crocs, three of them newly named species, are remains of a bizarre world of crocs that inhabited the southern land mass known as Gondwana some 100 million years ago.

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Extinct Moa Rewrites New Zealand’s History

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A reconstructed image of the giant extinct moa.

The evolutionary history of New Zealand’s many extinct flightless moa has been re-written in the first comprehensive study of more than 260 sub-fossil specimens to combine all known genetic, anatomical, geological and ecological information about the unique bird lineage.

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Bizarre Lives Of Bone-eating Worms

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This photograph shows a female of an as yet un-named boneworm in the genus Osedax, which has been carefully removed from the whale bone in which it was growing.

It sounds like a classic horror story — eyeless, mouthless worms lurk in the dark, settling onto dead animals and sending out green “roots” to devour their bones. In fact, such worms do exist in the deep sea. They were first discovered in 2002 by researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), who were using a robot submarine to explore Monterey Canyon. But that wasn’t the end of the story. After “planting” several dead whales on the seafloor, a team of biologists recently announced that as many as 15 different species of boneworms may live in Monterey Bay alone.

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Why Do Animals, Especially Males, Have So Many Different Colors?

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This male Hetaerina damselfly from the occisa species has red spots at the base and tip of its wings but no black pigmentation.

Why do so many animal species — including fish, birds and insects — display such rich diversity in coloration and other traits? In new research, Gregory Grether, UCLA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and Christopher Anderson, who recently earned his doctorate in Grether’s laboratory, offer an answer.

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Caught In The Act: Butterfly Mate Preference Shows How One Species Can Become Two

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Polymorphic mimicry in Heliconius cydno alithea in western Ecuador, where the white form mimics the white species Heliconius sapho and the yellow form mimics the yellow species Heliconius eleuchia.

Breaking up may actually not be hard to do, say scientists who’ve found a population of tropical butterflies that may be on its way to a split into two distinct species.

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