Terrible Teens Of T. Rex: Young Tyrannosaurs Did Serious Battle Against Each Other

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Young tyrannosaurs did serious battle against each other.

We all know adolescents get testy from time to time. Thank goodness we don’t have young tyrannosaurs running around the neighborhood.

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Junk DNA Mechanism That Prevents Two Species From Reproducing Discovered

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When two populations of a species become geographically isolated from each other, their genes diverge from one another over time.

Cornell researchers have discovered a genetic mechanism in fruit flies that prevents two closely related species from reproducing, a finding that offers clues to how species evolve.

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Color Differences Within And Between Species Have Common Genetic Origin

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Body hair difference is more pronounced between chimpanzees and humans than within our own species.

Spend a little time people-watching at the beach and you’re bound to notice differences in the amount, thickness and color of people’s body hair. Then head to the zoo and compare people to chimps, our closest living relatives. Continue reading… “Color Differences Within And Between Species Have Common Genetic Origin”

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Absent Pheromones Turn Male Flies Into Lusty Lotharios

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Fruit flies.

When Professor Joel Levine’s team genetically tweaked fruit flies so that they didn’t produce certain pheromones, they triggered a sexual tsunami in their University of Toronto Mississauga laboratory. In fact, they produced bugs so irresistible that normal male fruit flies attempted to mate with pheromone-free males and even females from a different species-generally a no-no in the fruit fly dating scene.

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Long Feared Extinct, Rare Bird Rediscovered

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Corvus unicolor, the long-lost Banggai Crow, was rediscovered on Indonesia’s Peleng Island.

Known to science only by two specimens described in 1900, a critically endangered crow has re-emerged on a remote, mountainous Indonesian island thanks in part to a Michigan State University scientist.

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Largest Dinosaur Footprints Ever Found Discovered Near Lyon, France

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Plagne site where sauropod dinosaur tracks were discovered. September 2009.

Footprints from sauropod dinosaurs, giant herbivores with long necks, were found in Plagne, near Lyon, France. Discovered by Marie-Hélène Marcaud and Patrice Landry, two nature enthusiasts, the dinosaur footprints have been authenticated by Jean-Michel Mazin and Pierre Hantzpergue, both of the Paléoenvironnements et Paléobiosphères laboratory

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Loyal Alligators Display Mating Habits Of Birds

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New studies show that alligators display the same loyalty to their mating partners as birds.

Alligators display the same loyalty to their mating partners as birds reveals a study published today in Molecular Ecology. The ten-year-study by scientists from the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory reveals that up to 70% of females chose to remain with their partner, often for many years.

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Monkeys’ Grooming Habits Provide New Clues To How We Socialize

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Grooming monkeys. A study of female monkeys’ grooming habits provides new clues about the way we humans socialize.

A study of female monkeys’ grooming habits provides new clues about the way we humans socialise. New research, published September 30 in Proceedings of the Royal Society, reveals there is a link between the size of the brain, in particular the neocortex which is responsible for higher-level thinking, and the size and number of grooming clusters that monkeys belong to.

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Rediscovering The Dragon’s Paradise Lost: Komodo Dragons Most Likely Evolved In Australia, Dispersed To Indonesia

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The Komodo Dragon is the world’s largest lizard, growing to an average length of 2 to 3 meters. It is found almost entirely on the Indonesian islands of Rinca, Flores and Komodo.

The world’s largest living lizard species, the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), is vulnerable to extinction and yet little is known about its natural history. New research by a team of palaeontologists and archaeologists from Australia, Malaysia and Indonesia, who studied fossil evidence from Australia, Timor, Flores, Java and India, shows that Komodo Dragons most likely evolved in Australia and dispersed westward to Indonesia.

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HIV’s Ancestors May Have Plagued First Mammals

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Some of the 850 new species discovered in underground water, caves and micro-caverns across outback Australia.

Australian researchers have discovered a huge number of new species of invertebrate animals living in underground water, caves and “micro-caverns” amid the harsh conditions of the Australian outback.

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New Species Discovered In The Greater Mekong At Risk Of Extinction

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Leopard gecko. A bird eating fanged frog, a gecko that looks like it’s from another planet and a bird which would rather walk than fly, are among the 163 new species discovered in the Greater Mekong region last year that are now at risk of extinction

A bird-eating fanged frog, a gecko that looks like it’s from another planet, and a bird which would rather walk than fly — these are among the 163 new species discovered in the Greater Mekong region last year that are now at risk of extinction, says a new report launched by WWF.

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First Evolutionary Branching For Bilateral Animals Found

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Flatworm with a home: An international research team led by Brown University has determined that the flatworm Acoelomorpha belongs as a sister clade to other bilateral animals.

When it comes to understanding a critical junction in animal evolution, some short, simple flatworms have been a real thorn in scientists’ sides. Specialists have jousted over the proper taxonomic placement of a group of worms called Acoelomorpha. This collection of worms, which comprises roughly 350 species, is part of a much larger group called bilateral animals, organisms that have symmetrical body forms, including humans, insects and worms. The question about acoelomorpha, was: Where do they fit in?

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