Ability To Literally Imagine Oneself In Another’s Shoes May Be Tied To Empathy

 painted-hands-clasping-empathy.jpg

 empathy involves the ability to simulate others internal states

New research from Vanderbilt University indicates the way our brain handles how we move through space—including being able to imagine literally stepping into someone else’s shoes—may be related to how and why we experience empathy toward others.

Continue reading… “Ability To Literally Imagine Oneself In Another’s Shoes May Be Tied To Empathy”

0

Male Or Female? Coloring Provides Gender Cues

090527121049-large.jpg

Our brain is wired to identify gender based on facial cues and coloring, according to a new study published in the Journal of Vision. Psychology Professor Frédéric Gosselin and his Université de Montréal team found the luminescence of the eyebrow and mouth region is vital in rapid gender discrimination.

Continue reading… “Male Or Female? Coloring Provides Gender Cues”

0

Genetic Basis Of Musical Aptitude

090526093925-large.jpg

 

Neurobiology Of Musicality Related To Intrinsic Attachment Behavior

Music is social communication between individuals — humming of lullabies attach infant to parent and singing or playing music adds croup cohesion.The neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment behavior, suggests a recent Finnish study. The study gives new information about genetic background of musical aptitude.

Continue reading… “Genetic Basis Of Musical Aptitude”

0

Snowball, the Dancing Cockatoo

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4E6HOPtU90&eurl=http://inventorspot.com/articles/snowball_dancing_cockatoo_disproves_evolutionary_theory_21320&feature=player_embedded[/youtube] 

You may have seen one of Snowball’s YouTube videos, or seen the sulpher-crested cockatoo on the David Letterman show. He’s made a hit on all the talk shows, and he’s even made a television commercial for a European bottled water.

Continue reading… “Snowball, the Dancing Cockatoo”

0

Are Optical Illusions Caused By The Brain Or The Eye?

Are Optical Illusions Caused By The Brain Or The Eye?

 (Left) Isia Leviant’s Enigma. Most viewers say the purple rings appear to fill with rapid illusory motion. (Right) A simplified version that the researchers used in the study. Most viewers report illusory motion lengthwise along the gray stripe.

When viewing the famous optical illusion painting Enigma by Isia Leviant, many people claim to see motion within the colored circles moving against the black and white striped background. Although this optical illusion has been known for a long time, its physiological origins are still unknown.

Continue reading… “Are Optical Illusions Caused By The Brain Or The Eye?”

0

Red Enhances Men’s Attraction To Women?…

 

41nf1dneeyl_ss500_.jpg

 YEA… Red is my new favorite color

A groundbreaking study by two University of Rochester psychologists to be published online Oct. 28 by the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology adds color—literally and figuratively—to the age-old question of what attracts men to women… (pics)

Continue reading… “Red Enhances Men’s Attraction To Women?…”

0

Mental Imagery Affects Visual Perception

Mental Imagery Affects Visual Perception

A graphic depiction of the sequence of events in the experiment from top left to bottom right.

First, a person looks at a blank screen and imagines a green pattern. Next, she puts on the red-green glasses and looks at a screen with two superimposed patterns: one green and one red. The green pattern is visible to one eye and the red image is visible to the other eye. The longer she has spent imagining the green pattern, the more likely it is that she will see the green pattern, demonstrating that what people imagine can influence what they see later in time.

Continue reading… “Mental Imagery Affects Visual Perception”

0