Future of Computer Interface Will Revolve Around Touch

Future of Computer Interface Will Revolve Around Touch 

 Nano-Touch

Earlier this week, the humble computer mouse celebrated its 40th birthday. While surprisingly little has changed since Doug Engelbart, an engineer at Stanford Research Institute, in Palo Alto, CA, first demonstrated the mouse to a skeptical crowd in San Francisco, we may have already seen a few glimpses of the future of computer interfaces. If so, over the next few years, the future of the computer interface will likely revolve around touch.

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Wearable Robotic Arm

Wearable Robotic Arm 

Tail-wrist-II

Paraplegics and the elderly often face problems with their joints and muscle movements. When stuck to bed owing to their illness, patients tend to develop contraction of muscles that could be irreversible, and regular range of motion exercises through physiotherapy is the only alternative left. There are a few muscle and joint extractors available to assist, but Tail-wrist-II seems to be a novel makeover in the category. Developed by Hideyuki Tsukakoshi, assistant professor of Mechanical Control Systems at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, the Tail-wrist-II is designed to prevent contraction of muscles and joints.

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Portable, Noninvasive Trauma Monitors

Portable, Noninvasive Trauma Monitors 

A portable, noninvasive monitor developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. 

Patients with severe injuries or serious infections run the risk of circulatory shock–a life-threatening condition in which the blood can’t supply tissues with enough oxygen and nutrients. If shock is recognized in time, the patient can be resuscitated with oxygen, intravenous fluids, and medications. But catching shock early is no simple matter. A small infrared sensor currently under development at the University of Massachusetts Medical School promises to detect impending shock earlier than any other noninvasive test.

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Making Materials That Repel All Liquids

Making Materials That Repel All Liquids 

 Water (dyed blue) and hexadecane (dyed red), an oil, bead up on an omniphobic surface, which repels all liquids.

Materials under development at MIT could lead to coatings that repel both water and oil. A group of MIT researchers have created an improved set of design rules for making any surface impervious to any liquid, be it water or gasoline. Such materials could eventually have promise as fingerprint-repelling coatings, fuel filters, self-washing car paints, and stain-resistant clothing.

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Prevent Head Explosions With Ear Pressure Equalizer

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Earache My Eye!

Frequent fliers, we know the sight well. The plane begins to land and our inner ear pressure swells, feeling something like the gradual multiplication of wet socks within our brain pan. A clench of the jaw and our inner ear pressure pops, making us feel marginally better. Ah. But in front of us, a fellow passenger is not so lucky. He grabs the side of his head, frantically swallowing and yawning, his mouth frothing over with half-chewed Chiclets, but nothing happens. Now he’s screaming. Oh god. Not again.

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Combo Pills: Treat Several Ailments In One Medication

Combo Pills:  Treat Several Ailments In One Medication 

Popping so many pills that you sometimes forget to take a medication? The drug companies think they have the answer: combination pills, which aim to treat several ailments in one medication. Indeed, dozens of combo pills are in the works to combat a range of ailments, from asthma and heart disease to arthritis and severe heartburn, by merging at least two medications into one.

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Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions

Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions 

The Palo Alto Research Center is using ink-jet printing technology to develop a disposable patch that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet for seven days to measure his or her exposure to blasts. 

Researchers are developing a cheap, lightweight plastic strip that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet to help diagnose brain injury.

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