GPS-Collared Coyotes to Control Rodents in Chicago

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Coyote in Chicago

Most of the time when a city has a rodent problem, they call in human exterminators. But Chicago seems to be testing out something slightly more… natural. After spotting a coyote running down State Street in Chicago, residents became aware of a project the city is testing out that includes allowing GPS-fitted coyotes to run free in the city specifically for them to gobble up problematic pests like rats, mice and rabbits. (Video)

 

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Mouse With Human Liver: New Model for Treatment of Liver Disease

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Mice whose own liver cells have been replaced with human hepatocytes (shown in green) can be successfully infected with hepatitis B virus (shown in red) providing a new way to test novel therapies for debilitating human liver diseases.

How do you study-and try to cure in the laboratory-an infection that only humans can get? A team led by Salk Institute researchers does it by generating a mouse with an almost completely human liver. This “humanized” mouse is susceptible to human liver infections and responds to human drug treatments, providing a new way to test novel therapies for debilitating human liver diseases and other diseases with liver involvement such as malaria.

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Some Mouse Sperm Can Identify, and Even Cooperate With, Its Brethren

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Male deer mouse.

Some mouse sperm can discriminate between its brethren and competing sperm from other males, clustering with its closest relatives to swim faster in the race to the egg. But this sort of cooperation appears to be present only in certain promiscuous species, where it affords an individual’s sperm a competitive advantage over that of other males.

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Why Females Live Longer Than Males: Is It Due to the Father’s Sperm?

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Laboratory mice.

Researchers in Japan have found that female mice produced by using genetic material from two mothers but no father live significantly longer than mice with the normal mix of maternal and paternal genes. Their findings provide the first evidence that sperm genes may have a detrimental effect on lifespan in mammals.

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New Species Of Giant Rat Discovered In Crater Of Volcano

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Bosavi giant woolly rat.

A Smithsonian Institution biologist, working with the Natural History Unit of the BBC, has discovered a new species of giant rat on a filmmaking expedition to a remote rainforest in New Guinea.

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Mouse With ‘Humanized Version’ Of Human Language Gene Provides Clues To Language Development

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 language development alterations found in the brains of mice

Scientists of the German Mouse Clinic at Helmholtz Zentrum München have made a major contribution to understanding human language development. Using a comprehensive screening method, they studied a mouse model carrying a “humanized version” of a key gene associated with human language.

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Why Can We Talk? ‘Humanized’ Mice Speak Volumes About Evolutionary Past

 

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Mice carrying a “humanized version” of a gene believed to influence speech and language may not actually talk, but they nonetheless do have a lot to say about our evolutionary past, according to a report in the May 29th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication.

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More Genetic Differences Between Mice And Humans Than Previously Thought

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CRAZY… who knew? couldn’t tell by the appearance right?

A new article in PLoS Biology explores exactly what distinguishes the human genome from that of the lab mouse. In the first comprehensive comparison between the genes of mice and humans, scientists from institutions across America, Sweden and the UK reveal that there are more genetic differences between the two species than had been previously thought.

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Transplanted Stem Cells Undo Birth Defects

Transplanted Stem Cells Undo Birth Defects 

 Neural stem cells, tagged green with a fluorescent dye, have been transplanted among the brain cells (red) of a mouse born with brain damage after its mother was given heroin during pregnancy.

By injecting stem cells directly into the brain, scientists have successfully reversed neural birth defects in mice whose mothers were given heroin during pregnancy. Even though most of the transplanted cells did not survive, they induced the brain’s own cells to carry out extensive repairs.

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