New Device Detects Objects Through Bubble Clouds

Detection of targets in bubbly waters are key goals of shallow-water sonar.

Scientists at the University of Southampton have developed a new kind of underwater sonar device that can detect objects through bubble clouds that would effectively blind standard sonar.

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Sharks and Wolves: Prey Interactions Similar on Land and in Oceans

major predators help control the populations of their prey… (but not people)

There may be many similarities between the importance of large predators in marine and terrestrial environments, researchers concluded in a recent study, which examined the interactions between wolves and elk in the United States, as well as sharks and dugongs in Australia.

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Marine Mr. Mom: Male Pipefish Gives Birth, but Some Are Deadbeat Dads, Study Shows

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Left: S. scovelli female. Right: Pregnant male Gulf pipefish.

Male pipefishes and their seahorse cousins are the only males that actually become pregnant and give birth, but pipefishes likely will never win any Father of The Year awards — their attitude towards their offspring can range from total love to total neglect, according to new findings from Texas A&M University researchers.

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Dolphins’ Health Shed Light on Human and Ocean Health

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The Georgia Dolphin Health Assessment capture-release study provides information on the health of the wild dolphin population that inhabits estuaries along the Georgia coast.

A panel of governmental, academic and non-profit scientists speaking at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) unveiled research suggesting that diseases found in dolphins are similar to human diseases and can provide clues into how human health might be affected by exposure to contaminated coastal water or seafood.

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In Bats and Whales, Convergence in Echolocation Ability Runs Deep

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Dolphin.

Only some bats and toothed whales rely on sophisticated echolocation, in which they emit sonar pulses and process returning echoes, to detect and track down small prey. Now, two new studies in the January 26th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, show that bats’ and whales’ remarkable ability and the high-frequency hearing it depends on are shared at a much deeper level than anyone would have anticipated — all the way down to the molecular level.

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Coral Can Recover from Climate Change Damage, New Research Suggests

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New research suggests that coral reefs located in marine reserves can recover from the impacts of global warming.

A study by the University of Exeter provides the first evidence that coral reefs can recover from the devastating effects of climate change. Published Jan. 11, 2010 in the journal PLoS ONE, the research shows for the first time that coral reefs located in marine reserves can recover from the impacts of global warming.

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Amazing Photos Of Antarctic Sea Life

basket star

The Basket Star is a bloodless creature that weighs 11 pounds and lives for about 35 years

Amazing pictures of Southern Ocean marine life captured by scientists working in the Antarctic were released today.  The inhabitants of the continent’s seas were captured as part of a study on biodiversity carried out by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

 

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Coconut-Carrying Octopus Surprises Scientists

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An octopus shows how it can carry a coconut shell under its
body while using its eight arms as stilts.

Scientists once thought of tool use as a defining feature of humans. That’s until examples of tool use came in from other primates, along with birds and an array of other mammals. Now, a report in the December 14th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, adds an octopus to the growing list of tool users. (Video)

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Deep-Sea World Beyond Sunlight: Explorers Census 17,650 Ocean Species on Edge of Black Abyss

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he nine known species of rare, primitive finned octopods are commonly called “Dumbos” because they flap a pair of large ear-like fins to swim, akin to the cartoon flying elephant.

Census of Marine Life scientists have inventoried an astonishing abundance, diversity and distribution of deep sea species that have never known sunlight — creatures that somehow manage a living in a frigid black world down to 5,000 meters (~3 miles) below the ocean waves.

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Whale-sized Genetic Study Largest Ever For Southern Hemisphere Humpbacks

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Humpback whales in southern populations are poorly understand in terms of their population structure. The new research will help researchers understand these populations and how they are connected, which in turn will help inform management decisions.

After 15 years of research in the waters of the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and an international coalition of organizations have unveiled the largest genetic study of humpback whale populations ever conducted in the Southern Hemisphere. Continue reading… “Whale-sized Genetic Study Largest Ever For Southern Hemisphere Humpbacks”

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Fish-Killing Toxin Could Kill Cancer Cells

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A powerful fish-killing toxin that has caused major losses in commercial ponds of catfish, striped bass and tilapia may also have cancer-killing properties.

A powerful fish-killing toxin could have cancer-killing properties as well, according to collaborative research led by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) microbiologist Paul V. Zimba and chemist Peter Moeller of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The toxin, called euglenophycin, has a molecular structure similar to that of solenopsin, an alkaloid from fire ant venom known to inhibit tumor development.

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