Early Life Nurturing Impacts Later Life Relationships, Prairie Vole Study Finds

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Prairie voles.

Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have demonstrated that prairie voles may be a useful model in understanding the neurochemistry of social behavior. By influencing early social experience in prairie voles, researchers hope to gain greater insight into what aspects of early social experience drive diversity in adult social behavior.

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Monkeys And Humans Use Parallel Mechanism To Recognize Faces

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Why does this image appear normal when viewed upside down, but clearly shows that it is distorted when right-side up? It’s a phenomenon known as the Thatcher effect.

Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have demonstrated for the first time rhesus monkeys and humans share a specific perceptual mechanism, configural perception, for discriminating among the numerous faces they encounter daily. The study, reported in the June 25 online issue of Current Biology, provides insight into the evolution of the critical human social skill of facial recognition, which enables us to form relationships and interact appropriately with others. Continue reading… “Monkeys And Humans Use Parallel Mechanism To Recognize Faces”

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Ability To Literally Imagine Oneself In Another’s Shoes May Be Tied To Empathy

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 empathy involves the ability to simulate others internal states

New research from Vanderbilt University indicates the way our brain handles how we move through space—including being able to imagine literally stepping into someone else’s shoes—may be related to how and why we experience empathy toward others.

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Need Something? Talk To My Right Ear

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We humans prefer to be addressed in our right ear.

We humans prefer to be addressed in our right ear and are more likely to perform a task when we receive the request in our right ear rather than our left. In a series of three studies, looking at ear preference in communication between humans, Dr. Luca Tommasi and Daniele Marzoli from the University “Gabriele d’Annunzio” in Chieti, Italy, show that a natural side bias, depending on hemispheric asymmetry in the brain, manifests itself in everyday human behavior.

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Social Competition May Be Reason For Bigger Brain

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 human brains have grown more than any other mammals

For the past 2 million years, the size of the human brain has tripled, growing much faster than other mammals. Examining the reasons for human brain expansion, University of Missouri researchers studied three common hypotheses for brain growth: climate change, ecological demands and social competition. The team found that social competition is the major cause of increased cranial capacity.

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Male Or Female? Coloring Provides Gender Cues

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Our brain is wired to identify gender based on facial cues and coloring, according to a new study published in the Journal of Vision. Psychology Professor Frédéric Gosselin and his Université de Montréal team found the luminescence of the eyebrow and mouth region is vital in rapid gender discrimination.

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Genetic Basis Of Musical Aptitude

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Neurobiology Of Musicality Related To Intrinsic Attachment Behavior

Music is social communication between individuals — humming of lullabies attach infant to parent and singing or playing music adds croup cohesion.The neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment behavior, suggests a recent Finnish study. The study gives new information about genetic background of musical aptitude.

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Red Enhances Men’s Attraction To Women?…

 

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 YEA… Red is my new favorite color

A groundbreaking study by two University of Rochester psychologists to be published online Oct. 28 by the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology adds color—literally and figuratively—to the age-old question of what attracts men to women… (pics)

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