Paving Roads With Pig Manure

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Creating New Uses For Excrement
A stretch of interstate highway near St. Louis, Missouri is now paved with asphalt made from pig manure:

“Whew!” gasped a worker with Pace Construction Co., the St. Louis County road contractor that joined forces with Innoventor, the Earth City-based engineering and design firm that perfected the process of converting the animal waste into a bio-oil used in asphalt binder.

To others, the air swelled with the sweet smell of potential for new manufacturing opportunities, jobs and, possibly, profits. How big is that potential? Nobody knows yet.

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Less Education Means More H1N1 Concern In The U.S.

vaccination

Low-income Americans with no more than a high school education appear more likely to get vaccinated against H1N1 swine flu than people with more money and better schooling, according to a poll released on Friday.   A telephone survey of 3,003 U.S. adults conducted by Thomson Reuters found that 49.8 percent of people with lower education levels were very concerned about H1N1, compared with only 29 percent of those with at least a four-year college degree.

 

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New H1N1 Flu Can Kill Fast According To Researchers

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A drawing of a pig and a biohazard sign mark the door of a lab where samples are tested for the H1N1 swine flu virus

The new H1N1 flu is “strikingly different” from seasonal influenza, killing much younger people than ordinary flu and often killing them very fast, World Health Organization officials said on Friday.   A review of studies done during the seven months the virus has been circulating shows it is usually mild, but can cause unusual and severe symptoms in an unlucky few, according to a WHO-sponsored meeting in Washington this week.

 

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Flu Vaccines Hit A Wall – Scientists Struggle To Speed Vaccine Development

Vaccine

Making a vaccine against seasonal influenza is a constant catch-up game. Scientists must predict which of the constantly mutating virus strains will be most virulent six months in the future, the amount of time it takes to manufacture the vaccine. The system has worked well enough for the regular flu. But when new, virulent strains emerge–including the current, rapidly spreading swine flu (H1N1)–the traditional approach falls short. Even as consumers clamored for a vaccine, it took seven months and around 48,000 confirmed U.S. cases before the first H1N1 vaccines were shipped to hospitals around the country.

 

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CartaSense Helps Monitor Swine Health For Potential Viral Outbreaks

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CartaSense chip

Cartasense is monitoring animals at home and on the range
It won’t help this time around alleviating the swine flu outbreak, but the Israeli company CartaSense has invented a chip to monitor swine health to nab potential viral outbreaks early.

 

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