Office Workers Should Have ‘Slop Buckets’ Installed Near Desks

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Slop buckets should be installed in offices

Already households are being forced to install “slop buckets” in kitchens so that unwanted food can be collected separately. Office workers should have access to a slop bucket near their desks to dispose of apple cores, tea bags and under food waste, according to Government plans to improve recycling by business.

 

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China’s Short Life Span of Buildings Creates Huge Waste

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Workers demolish a 20-story building that was illegally built in Wuhan, Hubei province.

The life span of the average residential building in China, the largest cement consumer in the world, has been blamed for causing tremendous waste. “Every year, new buildings in China total up to 2 billion square meters and use up 40 percent of the world’s cement and steel, but our buildings can only stand 25 to 30 years on average,” Qiu Baoxing, vice-minister of housing and urban-rural development, said at a recent international forum on green and energy-efficient building.

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Move Over Trash Cans – Introducing the Solar Powered Trash Compactor

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The BigBelly Solar Trash Compactor

A growing number of cities and municipalities are testing solar-powered trash compactors as a way to go green and save some green.
Communities in 46 states, as well as some state parks and colleges, are replacing regular trash cans, according to Richard Kennelly, vice president of BigBelly Solar marketing, which manufactures the devices.
Officials in states including California, Arizona and Pennsylvania say the trash compactors save long-term costs by reducing the number of trash pickups.
Powered by a solar panel, the compactor holds up to 32 gallons of compacted trash.
The newer models can send text messages to a central server when the cans are full to “minimize miles” in the trash pickup route, Kennelly says.
The cost of the cans varies. New York City leased solar-powered compactors for about $4,000 each, says Vito Turso, the Department of Sanitation’s deputy commissioner for public information and community affairs.
Philadelphia spent about $3,700 to purchase each compactor and $800 for recycling cans, Streets Commissioner Clarina Tollson says.
Pasadena, California, has deployed 12 of the containers over the past two years and bought 40 more in November that will be put in place this year, says Gabriel Silva, public works environmental program manager.
The trash compactors have helped beautify the area, said Gina Tleel, executive director for South Lake Business Association.
When Arizona State University began using the compactors, Refuse Coordinator Ted Woods doubted most students would use them.
“Boy, I had to eat my words, they work great,” says Woods, who said the containers have reduced the daily trash pickup to once a week.
The university received six donated compactors from Pepsi in 2006 and added 10 units in 2008, said Bonny Bentzin, director of university sustainability practices.
The compactors were installed at Georgetown University in October 2009, says William del Vecchio, manager of recycling and solid waste disposal at the university.
“Personally, I’m glad to see the university continuing its push for sustainability efforts,” said student Calen Angert, who uses the cans.
Student Nora White, who has used the bins on campus at Los Angeles Trade-Technical College, says they are a good reminder to recycle. “With them right beside each other, it puts it in your conscious,” she says.
Some states, including California, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Washington, got Department of Energy grants to purchase their solar-powered compactors.
Philadelphia used its grant to replace 700 litter baskets with 500 of the trash compactors and 210 sidewalk recycling cans in April 2009, Tollson says.
Not only have the containers helped with the green initiative, but they also reduced trash pickups from 17 times per week to five, she says.
As a result, employees have been reassigned where they are needed most.
“Philadelphia will save $13 million in cumulative collection over the next 10 years,” Tollson says.
New York City received mixed results when it tested earlier models from February to March in 2005, Turso says. He sees purchasing more wire mesh litter baskets, which cost $125 each, as a greater advantage. The solar-powered trash bins are being tested in Brooklyn.

A growing number of cities and municipalities are testing solar-powered trash compactors as a way to go green and save some green. Communities in 46 states, as well as some state parks and colleges, are replacing regular trash cans, according to Richard Kennelly, vice president of BigBelly Solar marketing, which manufactures the devices.

Officials in states including California, Arizona and Pennsylvania say the trash compactors save long-term costs by reducing the number of trash pickups. (Video)

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States Cut Waste by Streamlining and Reorganizing Amid Budget Crisis

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 States facing tough times during budget crisis are streamlining and reorganizing operation

States facing tough times are eliminating commissions, merging departments and centralizing operations to stave off budget cuts and tax hikes.  The moves represent the most sweeping attempts in at least a generation to cut waste in the day-to-day operations of state government, according to government experts.

 

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Longmont, CO Company First to Sign Up for Smarter, Safer, Greener House Contest

smarter, safer, greener house competition

RidgeviewTel was in. But now the company is all in.

The Longmont-based wireless broadband network company that runs the citywide Wi-Fi system is the now the first team in DaVinci Quest’s planned green-renovation contest in Longmont.

 

 

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United Nations Identifies e-waste as an Urgent And Growing Problem, Wants Change

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E-waste might be one of the biggest misnomers in the history of nomery — the image it creates in the mind is of a bunch of email and document files clogging up your local internet pipes. The reality of it is that electronic waste is rapidly populating ever-growing landfill areas in so-called developing countries (they’re poor, just call a spade a spade) and the issue has now garnered the attention of the United Nations…

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Ig Nobel Biology Prize Goes To Panda Poo Power

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Researchers from Kitasato University in Tokyo have been awarded this year’s Ig Nobel Biology Prize for demonstrating a method to reduce kitchen waste by more than 90% by using bacteria derived from Giant Panda excrement.  Professor Fumiaki Taguchi, who shares the prize with fellow researchers Song Guofu and Zhang Guanglei (both from the Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences), began the project in 1998 after suspecting panda feces must contain bacteria capable of breaking down even the hardiest of foods because of the bear’s vast consumption of bamboo.

 

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Illegal Toxic Waste Can Be Spotted From Space

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No place to hide

Move over Erin Brockovich. Today’s environmental detectives can use radar, helicopters and even satellite images to help them spot illegal toxic waste dumps and help catch those responsible.  Ironically, the tightening of restrictions on waste disposal and the enforcement of new recycling laws have made illegal dumping more likely, turning it into big business for the criminals involved.

 

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Glowing Trail Of Astronaut Urine Spotted In The Night Sky Over North America

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The photo actually shows a trail of urine and waste water streaming out of the shuttle Discovery.

The beautiful trail in the sky looked like a mysterious celestial event. In reality, it was urine.  Some skygazers were treated to the unexpected view of a bright sparkling glow Wednesday night, created when astronauts aboard the space shuttle Discovery dumped the waste out into space.

 

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New Design Makes Nuclear Reactors Cheaper and Faster To Build

New Design Makes Nuclear Reactors Cheaper and Faster To Build

A 4.5-meter-wide, 23-meter-long nuclear reactor designed to fit on a railcar for shipping to the site of a power plant. 

A new type of nuclear reactor that is designed to be manufactured in a factory rather than built at a power plant could cut construction times for nuclear power plants almost in half and make them cheaper to build. That, in turn, could make it possible for more utilities to build nuclear power plants, especially those in poor countries. The design comes from Babcock and Wilcox, a company based in Lynchburg, VA, that has made nuclear reactors for the United States Navy ships for about 50 years.

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Machine From Japan Turns Office Waste Into Toilet Paper

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The Other Way Around Would be More Impressive…
We’re not too sure what to think about this 1,300 lbs piece of machinery by Tokyo-based Nakabayashi. It takes paper waste from an office and turns it into toilet paper: “The toilet paper machine is able to produce two rolls per hour from around 1,800 sheets (or 7.2kg) of used A4-sized paper”. Seems like a whole lot of machine overkill. What’s the footprint of that machine and how much toilet paper should it produce before it compensate for that? More details after the jump…

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