Wireless Phones Can Affect The Brain, Swedish Study Suggests

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Mobile phones and other cordless telephones have a biological effect on the brain, according to new research.

A study at Örebro University in Sweden indicates that mobile phones and other cordless telephones have a biological effect on the brain. It is still too early to say if any health risks are involved, but medical researcher Fredrik Söderqvist recommends caution in the use of these phones, above all among children and adolescents. Few children who regularly use mobile phones use a headset often or always, even though the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority recommends this.

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Pain In The Neck: Too Much Texting Could Lead To Overuse Injuries

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Text messaging on a mobile phone.

The world record for fastest text message typing is held by a 21-year old college student from Utah, but his dexterous digits could mean serious injury later on. Most adults aged 18-21 prefer texting over e-mail or phone calls, and ergonomics researchers are starting to wonder whether it’s putting the younger generation at risk for some overuse injuries — once reserved for older adults who have spent years in front of a computer.

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Smoking Gun: Just One Cigarette Has Harmful Effect On Arteries Of Young Healthy Adults

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New research shows that even one cigarette has serious adverse effects on young adults.

Even one cigarette has serious adverse effects on young adults, according to research presented by Dr. Stella Daskalopoulou at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2009, co-hosted by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Cardiovascular Society.

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Did The Great Depression Have A Silver Lining? Life Expectancy Increased By 6.2 Years

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Buried machinery in barn lot in Dallas, South Dakota, during the Dust Bowl, an agricultural, ecological, and economic disaster in the Great Plains region of North America in 1936.

The Great Depression had a silver lining: During that hard time, U.S. life expectancy actually increased by 6.2 years, according to a University of Michigan study published in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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How Obesity Increases The Risk For Diabetes

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 fat guy in a little coat

Obesity is probably the most important factor in the development of insulin resistance, but science’s understanding of the chain of events is still spotty. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have filled in the gap and identified the missing link between the two. Their findings, to be published in the June 21, 2009 advance online edition of the journal Nature, explain how obesity sets the stage for diabetes and why thin people can become insulin-resistant.

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‘Life Force’ Linked To Body’s Ability To Withstand Stress

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An outgoing personality — especially in senior women — may increase the human ability to withstand stress

Our ability to withstand stress-related, inflammatory diseases may be associated, not just with our race and sex, but with our personality as well, according to a study published in the July issue of the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity. Especially in aging women, low levels of the personality trait extraversion may signal that blood levels of a key inflammatory molecule have crossed over a threshold linked to a doubling of risk of death within five years.

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Clock-shifts Affect Risk Of Heart Attack

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 Get that extra hour of sleep! But dont have a heart attack!

Adjusting the clocks to summer time on the last Sunday in March increases the risk of myocardial infarction in the following week. In return, putting the clocks back in the autumn reduces the risk, albeit to a lesser extent. This according to a new Swedish study

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