A Nobel Prize-winning psychologist says most people don’t really want to be happy

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We think we want to be happy. Yet many of us are actually working toward some other end, according to cognitive psychologist Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Nobel Prize in economics.

Kahneman contends that happiness and satisfaction are distinct. Happiness is a momentary experience that arises spontaneously and is fleeting. Meanwhile, satisfaction is a long-term feeling, built over time and based on achieving goals and building the kind of life you admire. On the Dec. 19 podcast “Conversations with Tyler,” hosted by economist Tyler Cowen, Kahneman explains that working toward one goal may undermine our ability to experience the other.

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Employees Who Are Dedicated Have A Happier Home Life

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Employees who are invigorated and dedicated have a happier home life, according to a new Kansas State University study.  The researchers studied how positive work experiences extend into family life and facilitate family interactions.   They found that employees who are engaged in their woek, which includes higher levels of vigour, more dedication and absorption in daily activities, have better moods and more satisfaction at home.

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