Denser cities are smarter and more productive

Density brings people and firms closer together.

One of the most important, and at times contentious topics in urban development is density.  Density plays an important role in economic growth. Density brings people and firms closer together which makes it easier to share and exchange information, invent new technologies, and launch new firms.

 

 

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Why Water Expands When It Cools

macro-water-droplet

Water droplet

Most of us, when we take our first science classes, learn that when things cool down, they shrink. (When they heat up, we learn, they usually expand.) However, water seems to be the exception to the rule. Instead of shrinking as it cools, this common liquid actually expands. In order to explain this phenomenon, some scientists have adopted the “mixture” model, which purports that low-density, ice-like components dominate due to cooling. Masakazu Matsumoto, at the Nagoya University Research Center for Materials Science in Japan, has a different idea. He describes his findings in Physical Review Letters: “Why Does Water Expand When It Cools?”

 

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Cheaper And More Reliable Lithium-Ion Batteries

Cheaper And More Reliable Lithium-Ion Batteries

Lithium-ion cells that use polymer electrolytes can be affordably packaged in compact, flexible pouches  

A new incarnation of lithium-ion batteries based on solid polymers is in the works. Berkeley, CA-based startup Seeo, Inc. says its lithium-ion cells will be safer, longer-lasting, lighter, and cheaper than current batteries. Seeo’s batteries use thin films of polymer as the electrolyte and high-energy-density, light-weight electrodes. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is now making and testing cells designed by the University of California, Berkeley spinoff.

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Radiology Art

submarine-med.jpg

See Through Sub Parts

The Radiology Art project features scans submitted by different folks. This is a CT scan of a toy submarine. Note the mechanical spring-loaded propulsion mechanism in the center most location. This motor spins the paddle wheels located on either side of the main body. Screws can also be seen at the front and back of the sub, as well as connecting the periscope apparati. Portals located below the periscopes suggest an ocular function.

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