2010 census trends: Uneven aging and ‘younging’ in the U.S.

 population change

 The divide between states gaining and losing their younger populations.

When the Beatles song “When I’m Sixty-Four” was released in 1967, many baby boomers adhered to the mantra, “Don’t trust anyone over 30.” Now the boomers are fully ensconced in advanced middle age, and the oldest of them are beginning to cross into full-fl edged senior-hood, as the first boomer turned age 65 last January. Some 80 million strong and more than one quarter of the U.S. population, baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1965) are a still a force to be reckoned with, even as they have all crossed the age-45 marker. Along with their elders, the large and growing older American population presents significant future challenges for federal government programs such as Social Security and Medicare. State and local social services and infrastructure needs will also change in communities across the nation as the population ages.

 

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Minorities make up the majority of U.S. babies

babies

Minorities outnumber whites among babies under age 2.

Minorities make up a majority of babies in the U.S., for the first time ever.  The ‘cultural generation gap’ is part of a sweeping race change and a growing age divide between mostly white, older Americans and predominantly minority youths that could reshape government policies.

 

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Dad’s spend twice as much time with kid’s than they did a few generations ago

father_children_playing

“Take Time To Be a Dad Today”

The percentage of  fathers in the U.S. who live apart from their children has doubled over the last 50 years. But, many dad’s today are spending more than twice as much time with their kids as they did back then.

 

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Detroit’s Population Shrank 25% in Last Decade

The Motor City’s engine is dying. Detroit’s population shrank by more than 25% in the last decade, according to Census statistics reported in the New York Times. The city’s population fell to 713,777 in 2010, a drop of almost 240,000 residents. That’s 100,000 more than Katrina-ravaged New Orleans lost.

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Higher Than Expected Hispanic Growth Reaching 50 Million, Now 1 in 6 Americans: Census

 hispanic-growth-in-u-s-ahead-of-estimates

Hispanics are currently the fastest growing group.

In a surprising show of growth, Hispanics accounted for more than half of the U.S. population increase over the last decade, exceeding estimates in most states. Pulled by migration to the Sun Belt, America’s population center edged westward on a historic path to leave the Midwest.

 

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1 in 4 U.S. Counties Are Dying

Census Dying Counties

A coal truck drives through an railroad tressel near downtown Welch, W.Va.

Nestled within America’s once-thriving coal country, 87-year-old Ed Shepard laments a prosperous era gone by, when shoppers lined the streets and government lent a helping hand. Now, here as in one-fourth of all U.S. counties, West Virginia’s graying residents are slowly dying off.

 

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Pew Research – Marriage Declines, New Families Rise

marriage

Sharp decline in marriage over the last 50 years.

The transformative trends of the past 50 years that have led to a sharp decline in marriage and a rise of new family forms have been shaped by attitudes and behaviors that differ by class, age and race, according to a new Pew Research Center nationwide survey, conducted in association with TIME magazine, and complemented by an analysis of demographic and economic data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

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