Breathprint could one day be used to help diagnose disease

Our breathprint could be used to detect signature metabolites associated with disease.

Our fingerprints are unique to us, but so may be our breath.  Compounds in exhaled air produce a unique and stable molecular autograph or “breathprint” – one that could be used to monitor disease or track response to medication.

 

 

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Cost of dementia care in the U.S. will double by 2040

Facing the aging of the baby boom generation, the U.S. is unprepared for the coming surge in the cost and cases of dementia.

How much does it cost to care for American’s with dementia?  A new study has found that the financial burden is at least as high as that of heart disease or cancer, and it may be even higher. And both the costs and the number of people with dementia will more than double within 30 years, skyrocketing at a rate that rarely occurs with a chronic disease.

 

 

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U.S. scientists make a breakthrough in tuberculosis

Tuberculosis most commonly affects the lungs, is transmitted via the air and caused by strains of mycobacteria.

Worldwide, more than 2 billion people are struck down with tuberculosis (TB).  Scientists in the U.S. have made a medical breakthrough that could save hundreds of thousands of lives.

 

 

 

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Brace yourselves for the worst flu season in a decade

The latest influenza activity update in the U.S. has just been released by the CDC  and it’s not a pretty picture. First things first: GET VACCINATED. If you’re over six months old or someone you interact with on a regular basis is at high risk of flu complications (i.e. young, old, pregnant, immunocompromised, etc.):  GET VACCINATED. This year’s flu  virus has arrived early and it has health officials across the country bracing themselves for what could be the worst flu season in a decade.

 

 

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Cancer comes in more shades than just pink: Studies

We have even more reason to understand breast cancer as multiple diseases.

Every year we go though a full month of pink, pink and more pink, all in the name of “breast cancer awareness.” What once was a health-related cause has become the feel-virtuous-and-buy-stuff season wedged between back-to-school and holiday gift giving.

 

 

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New federal obesity statistics show Mississippi fattest, Colorado thinnest

The rate for the South was 29.5%, followed by the Midwest at 29%, the Northeast at 25.3% and the West at 24.3%.

On Monday, the federal government released its “obesity map”, outlining the rates of obesity and how rates in the states compare. Colorado gets the svelte bragging rights, with 20.7% of its adults obese. At the other end of the scale is Mississippi, with a rate of 34.9%.

 

 

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Skin cancer drug reverses Alzheimer’s in mice

alzheimers

Skin cancer drug reverses Alzheimer’s in mice, is there hope for humans?

A laboratory study indicates that a drug commonly used to fight skin cancer could start to reverse Alzheimer’s disease in a matter of hours. Researchers have described the discovery as an “unprecedented finding” that holds out “the potential promise of a therapy for Alzheimer’s”.

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Elderly heart patients prefer longevity over quality of life

heart patient

Survey found three quareters of elderly heart failure patients wouldn’t trade a longer life with symptoms for a shorter life without them.

Many doctors might assume tha when an elderly patient’s chronic disease is impossible to cure they would prefer to improve the quality of their remaining life rather than extend it as it is.  Most of the time those doctors would be mistaken, according to a new study.

 

 

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30% drop in hospital stays for heart failure, saving billions

heart failure

Heart failure hospitalizations have decreased nationally overall.

There was a remarkable 30% drop in hospital stays for heart failure in Medicare patients over a decade. It is the first such decline in the United States and forceful evidence that the nation is making headway in reducing the billion-dollar burden of a common condition.

 

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