By Monit Khanna

Highlights

The device is called Synchron Switch and it converts the thoughts of people suffering from paralysis into action. It works with the help of a bunch of sensors dubbed Strentrode that is inserted into the top of the brain via a blood vessel and is controlled wirelessly with the help of a Synchron Switch that’s at the patient’s chest

Synchron, a New York-based company is working on a brain-computer interface (BCI) technology that allows patients to control iPhones and iPads hands-free, by simply using their minds, reveals a report by Semafor.

Brain Sensor Implant Helps Paralysed Individuals Control An iPad Using Their Minds

Synchron

The device is called Synchron Switch and it converts the thoughts of people suffering from paralysis into action. It works with the help of a bunch of sensors dubbed Strentrode that is inserted into the top of the brain via a blood vessel and is controlled wirelessly with the help of a Synchron Switch that’s at the patient’s chest.

As of now, the device is being used by six patients. Rodney Gorham — a retired software salesman in Australia suffering from ALS — is the first one to try this out with an Apple product. Gorham is able to control his iPad using the switch and even send single-worded text messages.

The company is the first to receive approval from the US Food and Drug Administration to run clinical trials on a computer-brian implant. The company also pays back the cost of surgery, involved in inserting and maintaining the device.

Brain Sensor Implant Helps Paralysed Individuals Control An iPad Using Their Minds

Synchron

Tom Oxley, Synchron’s co-founder and CEO said in a statement, “We’re excited about iOS and Apple products because they’re so ubiquitous. And this would be the first brain switch input into the device.”

According to Oxley, the skills necessary to implant the sensor is a common procedure, requiring neurosurgery. He highlights that if the FDA approves the device for widespread use, it could help make computer-brain implants more ubiquitous, especially among people suffering from disabilities.

Via IndiaTimes.com

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