Tech companies are starting to let their employees work from anywhere — as long as they take a lower salary

 F63F8BA2-B48A-42D6-8547-557194691699

Software firm VMware will start cutting pay for employees who leave Silicon Valley, according to a recent Bloomberg report.

While employees can work remotely on a permanent basis, they could face an 18% pay cut for moving to a city like Denver, Bloomberg reports.

VMware isn’t the only company reconsidering employee pay. Facebook will start adjusting salaries in January based on where employees live, according to The New York Times.

Twitter has had a pay localization policy in place for years as part of a broader push to decentralize its workforce.

Continue reading… “Tech companies are starting to let their employees work from anywhere — as long as they take a lower salary”

0

6 charts that show what employers and employees really think about remote working

04DCCDA4-454F-43B4-BC42-0012B49C6DEC

Remote working has meant many people are skipping their morning commute.

COVID-19 has lead to more and more employees working from home.

98% of people surveyed said they would like the option to work remotely for the rest of their careers.

But not everything is positive, with workers finding the biggest challenge is ‘unplugging’ from work.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, nearly one-third of the U.S. workforce, and half of all “information workers”, are able to work from home. Though the number of people working partially or fully remote has been on the rise for years now, the COVID-19 pandemic may have pressed the fast-forward button on this trend.

With millions of people taking part in this work-from-home experiment, it’s worth asking the question – how do people and companies actually feel about working from home?

Continue reading… “6 charts that show what employers and employees really think about remote working”

0

San Francisco rents plunge as tech employees abandon high-priced city to work remotely

61C2C5EF-234E-45F7-8FD3-A417783E2F81

Twitter, Facebook among companies that will allow employees to work remotely moving forward

 Coronavirus causes ‘big movement’ out of New York City: Moving company president

Roadway Moving President Ross Sapir says more people are leaving New York City for nearby states or southern states, like Florida and Texas.

Coronavirus-related work-from-home policies at the country’s biggest technology companies appear to have caused an exodus from Silicon Valley, which has sent rent prices in San Francisco plummeting.

Rents for a one-bedroom apartment in the major metro area were down 9.2 percent in June when compared with the same period last year, according to data from rental site Zumper. That is the largest decline since at least 2015 and brings the price point ($3,360) down to where it was three years ago.

In the U.S. overall, one-bedroom rents fell by just 0.2 percent. No other major metro city’s data came close to the decrease in San Francisco.

Continue reading… “San Francisco rents plunge as tech employees abandon high-priced city to work remotely”

0

If working from home is the ‘future of work,’ here are 11 reasons why the office sounds better

 Woman Working From Home Having Group Videoconference On Laptop

Can we foster the same work culture and communication standards through a video chat?

In the midst of the ongoing pandemic, there is an awakening among CEOs that employees are capable of doing work and being productive from home.

This week, Twitter announced that employees can work from home indefinitely, becoming the first big tech company to make such an open-ended switch in policy. Twitter, the service, was buzzing, with many investors and pundits calling it the end of the office space as we know it.

For the last five years, there’s been an increasing chorus of engineers, designers and professionals claiming that remote work is the future.

I’ve been working from home on and off for the last two decades. I find I can be more productive for some types of work and have more time to exercise, cook and be with the family when I’m working from home. On the flip side, activities that need high-bandwidth collaboration and communication are harder. Certain aspects of team and company building are also much harder to achieve.

Continue reading… “If working from home is the ‘future of work,’ here are 11 reasons why the office sounds better”

0

The future of work looks like staying out of the office

815900A4-1C01-493B-B31E-E974B1F29CAE

Dozens of studies find remote workers happy and productive. Why not let them be?

It’s 2020: we finally live in the future! Or at least a future—one where broadband Internet connections and portable, reasonably high-powered computing tools are pervasive and widely accessible, even if they aren’t yet universal. Millions of workers, including all of us here at Ars, use those tools to do traditional “office jobs” from nontraditional home offices.

Tens of millions of jobs at all points of the income and skill spectrum are of course not suited to remote work. Doctors, dentists, and countless other healthcare workers of the world will always need to be hands-on with patients, just as teachers need to be in schools, construction workers need to be on building sites, scientists need to be in labs, wait staff need to be in restaurants, judges need to be in court, and hospitality employees need to be in hotels. All of that said, though, many more of the hundreds of different kinds of jobs Americans do can be done off-site than currently are.

Continue reading… “The future of work looks like staying out of the office”

0

The 2020 state of remote work

B5399F91-1769-47AA-B9F0-DD6E324E6088

Top insights and data from one of the largest remote work reports.

When some people think of the workplace of the future, they envision futuristic-style holograms having a meeting or robots cooking lunch for everyone in the office.

Increasingly, though, the workplace of the future is looking more simple — people having the flexibility to work remotely from home with teammates all around the world.

With that in mind, the question is no longer “is remote work here to stay?” It seems like remote work might even be the new normal.

The real question now is “what trends are growing across the remote work landscape?”

So, we’re digging into the data.

Continue reading… “The 2020 state of remote work”

0

10 remote work trends that will dominate 2019

 https---blogs-images.forbes.com-abdullahimuhammed-files-2018-12-pexels-photo-1061583

Remote work is no longer a privilege. It’s become the standard operating mode for at least 50% of the U.S. population. Virtual retreats are no longer attributed solely to progressive startups. Traditional employers are finally on-board and ready to propose a flexible work arrangement higher up the pipeline.

2019 will further reinforce the current global shift towards “remote-friendly” workplaces and dictate a few more unique trends.

Continue reading… “10 remote work trends that will dominate 2019”

0