One of the earliest known examples of math homework

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Math on the go.

It’s stuff like this that makes me love archaeology. Turns out, we can trace the concept of math homework back to at least 2300 B.C.E., in ancient Mesopotamia.

In the early 20th century, German researchers found several clay tablets at the site ofŠuruppak. (Today, that’s basically the Iraqi city of Tell Fara.) Some of the tablets appear to be the remains of math instruction, including two different tablets that are working the same story problem…

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“Should We Clone Neanderthals?”

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Hot genes to clone!

That’s the provocative title of an article in this month’s Archaeology magazine exploring the scientific, legal, and ethical considerations involved. Extensive information about the Neanderthal genetic code is available, and the technologic problems can apparently be overcome. Questions remain about how the process might best be accomplished, and whether it should be done at all.

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Scientists Find Evidence Of First Human Occupation In Australia

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Evidence of what could be Australia’s earliest human occupation has been found on the fringe of desert in the country’s remote northwest, archaeologists said Tuesday.

Peter Veth, of the Australian National University, said an artifact dated at between 45,000 and 50,000 years old found near the shores of Lake Gregory could be the start of a 25-year study into Australia’s first humans.

“This is the first evidence of human activity … in the arid northwest of the continent which can be dated to a time before the last great Ice Age,” he said in a statement.

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Heart Disease Found in Egyptian Mummies

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This image shows the mummy of Esankh, male, Third Intermediate Period (1070-712 BCE), undergoing CT scanning.

Hardening of the arteries has been detected in Egyptian mummies, some as old as 3,500 years, suggesting that the factors causing heart attack and stroke are not only modern ones; they afflicted ancient people, too.

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Skeleton Found At Roman Site In Britain Mystifies Archaeologists

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A skeleton, found at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

A skeleton, found at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

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Oldest Evidence Of Leprosy Found In India

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A new meaning to “back to the bible”

A biological anthropologist from Appalachian State University working with an undergraduate student from Appalachian, an evolutionary biologist from UNC Greensboro, and a team of archaeologists from Deccan College (Pune, India) recently reported analysis of a 4000-year-old skeleton from India bearing evidence of leprosy.

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