Scientists develop 3D, continuously multidirectional cloaking device

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The multidirectional “perfect paraxial” cloak bends light around the hand to show the grid on the wall.

Two University of Rochester scientists have taken invisibility cloaking back to basics. Their novel arrangement of four standard, off-the-shelf lenses keeps an object hidden (and the background undisturbed) as the viewer moves up to several degrees away from the optimal viewing angle. (Video)

 

 

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3D acoustic cloak makes objects undetectable with sound

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The geometry of the plastic sheets and placement of the holes interact with sound waves to make it (and objects beneath it) appear as if they are not there.

Duke University engineers have demonstrated the world’s first three-dimensional acoustic cloak using a few perforated sheets of plastic and extensive computation. The new device reroutes sound waves to create the impression that both the cloak and anything beneath it are not there. (Video)

 

 

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UT Austin researchers create an ultrathin invisibility cloak

 Bulky devices are an obvious flaw for those interested in Harry Potter-style applications.

Invisibility cloaks put forward by scientists have been fairly bulky devices, until now.  University of Texas at Austin researchers have now developed a cloak that is just micrometers thick and can hide three-dimensional objects from microwaves in their natural environment, in all directions and from all of the observers’ positions.

 

 

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Light-Bending Nanoparticles Could Lead To Superlenses, Invisibility Cloaks

 Light-Bending Nanoparticles Could Lead To Superlenses, Invisibility Cloaks

Directional scattering of an incoming electromagnetic wave by oriented nanocups.

Researchers at Rice University have created a metamaterial that could light the way toward high-powered optics, ultra-efficient solar cells and even cloaking devices.

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Time’s Top 10 Scientific Discoveries

Time’s Top 10 Scientific DiscoveriesTime’s Top 10 Scientific Discoveries 

1. Large Hadron Collider

Good news! The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) – the massive particle accelerator straddling the Swiss-French border – didn’t destroy the world! The bad news: The contraption didn’t really work either. In September, the 17-mile collider was switched on for the first time, putting to rest the febrile webchatter that the machine would create an artificial black hole capable of swallowing the planet or at least a sizeable piece of Europe – a bad day no matter what. No lucid observer ever thought that would really happen, but what they did expect was that the LHC would operate as advertised, recreating conditions not seen since instants after the Big Bang and giving physicists a peek into those long-vanished moments. Things looked good at first, until a helium leak caused the collider to shut down after less than two weeks. Repairs are underway and the particles should begin spinning again sometime in June.

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Invisibility Cloaks Could Take the Sting out of Hurricanes

Invisibility Cloaks Could Take the Sting out of Hurricanes

Protection comes in many forms

Invisibility cloaks that are able to steer light around two dimensional objects have become reality in the last few years. But the first real-world application of the theories that made them possible could be in hiding vulnerable coastlines and offshore platforms from destructive hurricanes and tsunamis.

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