Treadmill Allows You to Take a Virtual Run Anywhere on Google Earth

During CES last week, Panasonic connected a Nordic Track treadmill to the Internet, and the result is a stationary run using Google Maps that feels real.

A Panasonic Viera Connect HDTV displays Google Maps and communicates inclinations of hills and valleys to the treadmill. The machine is smart enough to incline itself at the appropriate times, matching those hills every step of the way…

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Flexible Touch Screen Made with Printed Graphene Could Make Displays Super Fast

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Researchers have created a flexible graphene sheet with silver electrodes printed on it that can be used as a touch screen.

Graphene, a sheet of carbon just one atom thick, has spectacular strength, flexibility, transparency, and electrical conductivity. Spurred on by its potential for application in new devices like touch screens and solar cells, researchers have been toying with ways to make large sheets of pure graphene, for example by shaving off atom-thin flakes and chemically dissolving chunks of graphite oxide. Yet in the thirty-some years since graphene’s discovery, laboratory experiments have mainly yielded mere flecks of the stuff, and mass manufacture has seemed a long way away.

 

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Top 5 Tech Toys Of 2009 And 5 More On The Way

Top 5 Tech Toys Of 2009 And 5 More On The Way 

2008 was a good year for gadgets, and we’re hoping that ’09 will be just as impressive. We’re only a month in so far, but Palm, Dell, Sony and even Amazon have all dropped hints about what the companies have in store. We’ve collected the five big announcements that have us drooling, as well as five more that we’d like to see happen before 2010.

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The Power Of Nanotubes

The Power Of Nanotubes 

 The researchers at the University of Southern California

Researchers at the University of Southern California have created a a clear, colorless disk about 5 inches in diameter that bends and twists like a playing card, with a lattice of more than 20,000 nanotube transistors. It is capable of having high-performance electronics printed on it using a potentially inexpensive low-temperature process.

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Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions

Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions 

The Palo Alto Research Center is using ink-jet printing technology to develop a disposable patch that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet for seven days to measure his or her exposure to blasts. 

Researchers are developing a cheap, lightweight plastic strip that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet to help diagnose brain injury.

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Holographic Televisions Only 5 To 10 Years Away

Holographic Televisions Only Be 5 To 10 Years Away 

Holographic television sets may be only a few years off thanks to a new breakthrough in 3D technology. Researchers at the University of Arizona said they had made the first updatable 3D displays with memory, a prerequisite for getting any holographic image to move. With the new technology, displays can now be erased and rewritten in a matter of minutes.

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3-D Holographic Displays

3-D Holographic Displays

 The holodeck is still a few years off, but this is an interesting step forward

The ICT Graphics Lab at USC has created a low-cost volumetric 3-D display that brings Princess Leia one step closer to begging Obi-Wan for help. The system projects high-speed video onto a rapidly spinning mirror. As the mirror turns, it reflects a different and accurate image to each potential viewer. (Video)

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