Who needs ink cartridges? Harvard’s acoustic printer can spit out honey or cells

We’re all about innovative printing methods here at Digital Trends and, boy, have the folks at Harvard not disappointed with their latest piece of research. It involves using sound waves to make it possible to print with virtually any liquid imaginable. That includes everything from human cells and liquid metal to optical resins and even honey. Needless to say, these aren’t the usual water-like printing materials found in ordinary inkjet printers. The results could prove useful in fields including pharmaceutical development, cosmetics, or even the food industry.

“We have developed a new drop-on-demand printing method that is conducive to printing liquids with low to very high viscosity,” Jennifer Lewis, the Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, told Digital Trends. “It’s exciting, because it can be applied to a very broad range of liquids.”

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Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions

Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions 

The Palo Alto Research Center is using ink-jet printing technology to develop a disposable patch that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet for seven days to measure his or her exposure to blasts. 

Researchers are developing a cheap, lightweight plastic strip that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet to help diagnose brain injury.

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