We’re starting to learn some incredible things about hypnosis

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About 15% of the population is way more hypnotisable than everybody else.

There is increasing scientific evidence to say that hypnosis is an important psychological tool with some exciting applications, from curing anxiety to reducing pain, and potentially fighting addiction.

So why do we still tend to think of hypnosis as a sideshow performance?

And what’s the science behind it?

Continue reading… “We’re starting to learn some incredible things about hypnosis”

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Hacking our nervous system

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Former gymnast Maria Vrind from Volendam in the Netherlands, had to accept that things had reached a crisis point, when she found that the only way she could put her socks on in the morning was to lie on her back with her feet in the air.  “I had become so stiff I couldn’t stand up,” she says. “It was a great shock because I’m such an active person.”   Continue reading… “Hacking our nervous system”

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Dramatic Increase in Strokes Among Young and Middle-Aged Americans

Chart compares hospitalizations for stroke, by age group.

Strokes are rising dramatically among young and middle-aged Americans while dropping in older ones, a sign that the obesity epidemic may be starting to reshape the age burden of the disease.

 

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Doctors Face a Moral Dilemma with Early Alzheimer’s Detection – Should Patients Be Told?

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Early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer’s lead to a moral dilemma

Marjie Popkin thought she had chemo brain, that fuzzy-headed forgetful state that she figured was a result of her treatment for ovarian cancer. She was not thinking clearly — having trouble with numbers, forgetting things she had just heard.

 

Continue reading… “Doctors Face a Moral Dilemma with Early Alzheimer’s Detection – Should Patients Be Told?”

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Scientists Use Own Children As Test Subjects

Scientists Use Own Children As Test Subjects 

Even before his son was born, Pawan Sinha saw unique potential.  At a birthing class, Dr. Sinha, a neuroscience professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, stunned everyone, including his wife, by saying he was excited about the baby’s birth “because I really want to study him and do experiments with him.” He did, too, strapping a camera on baby Darius’s head, recording what he looked at.

Continue reading… “Scientists Use Own Children As Test Subjects”

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