Quantum states in conventional electronics may beat end of Moore’s law

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Graduate students Kevin Miao, Chris Anderson, and Alexandre Bourassa monitor quantum experiments at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Scientists at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering have found a way to produce quantum states in ordinary, everyday electronics. By harnessing the properties of quantum mechanics without exotic materials or equipment, this raises the possibility that quantum information technologies can be created using current devices.

For decades, the computer industry has benefited from Moore’s law, which is a rule of thumb that predicts that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit will double about every two years. As this has held up, computers have gone from giant machines that were part of the buildings that housed them to tiny devices that can fit on a thumbnail, yet can outperform any supercomputer from previous generations.

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Why Everything Is Getting Louder

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The tech industry is producing a rising din. Our bodies can’t adapt.

Karthic thallikar first noticed the noise sometime in late 2014, back when he still enjoyed taking walks around his neighborhood.

He’d been living with his wife and two kids in the Brittany Heights subdivision in Chandler, Arizona, for two years by then, in a taupe two-story house that Thallikar had fallen in love with on his first visit. The double-height ceilings made it seem airy and expansive; there was a playground around the corner; and the neighbors were friendly, educated people who worked in auto finance or at Intel or at the local high school. Thallikar loved that he could stand in the driveway, look out past a hayfield and the desert scrub of Gila River Indian land, and see the jagged pink outlines of the Estrella Mountains. Until recently, the area around Brittany Heights had been mostly farmland, and there remained a patchwork of alfalfa fields alongside open ranges scruffy with mesquite and coyotes.

In the evenings, after work, Thallikar liked to decompress by taking long walks around Brittany Heights, following Musket Way to Carriage Lane to Marlin Drive almost as far as the San Palacio and Clemente Ranch housing developments. It was during one of these strolls that Thallikar first became aware of a low, monotone hum, like a blender whirring somewhere in the distance. It was irritating, but he wrote it off. Someone’s pool pump, probably. On another walk a few days later, he heard it again. A carpet-cleaning machine? he wondered. A few nights later, there it was again. It sounded a bit like warped music from some far-off party, but there was no thump or rhythm to the sound. Just one single, persistent note: EHHNNNNNNNN. Evening after evening, he realized, the sound was there—every night, on every street. The whine became a constant, annoying soundtrack to his walks.

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Sono could soundproof your home from city noise

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Living in a city has plenty of perks. You have convenient metro systems, plenty of gourmet dining choices and endless shopping destinations. But with all that activity comes a whole lot of noise pollution. The noise is an unavoidable side effect of living with millions of other people. That noise is likely to permeate your living space unless you’ve gone through the trouble of retrofitting your home with some kind of soundproofing. (Video)

 

 

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Driving a Convertible with the Top Down Could Damage Your Health

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Driving a convertible exposes drivers and passengers to dangerous noise levels. 

Driving a convertible with the top down could expose you to dangerous noise levels on a par with a building site, claims a new study.  Levels as high as 100 decibels were recorded at speeds of 75mph which for long periods could lead to damage to hearing.

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Growing Number of Homeowners in U.S. Complain Noise from Wind Turbines Making Life Unbearable

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The industrial whoosh-and-whoop of the 123-foot blades is making life unbearable for some.

Like nearly all of the residents on this island in Penobscot Bay, Art Lindgren and his wife, Cheryl, celebrated the arrival of three giant wind turbines late last year. That was before they were turned on. “In the first 10 minutes, our jaws dropped to the ground,” Mr. Lindgren said. “Nobody in the area could believe it. They were so loud.”

 

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‘Speech Bubble’ Helmets to Combat Bar Noise

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The spheres aim to allow people to hear each other more clearly in a busy bar.

Speech bubbles which could provide the answer for people who want to make their voice heard in noisy bars and clubs are set to go on display.  Product design student Elaine McLuskey invented the “social spheres” to enable people to hold a conversation above the background noise.

 

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Explorers Discover World’s Largest Cave In Vietnamese Jungle

Explorers Discover World’s Largest Cave In Vietnamese Jungle

Possibly the world’s largest cave passage, Hang Son Doong was discovered in the heart of the Vietnamese jungle by a British caving team.

A British caving team believe they have discovered the world’s largest cave passage in the heart of the Vietnamese jungle. (Pics)

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‘Acoustic Fingerprints’ Can Be Used For Identification

‘Acoustic Fingerprints’ Can Be Used For Identification 

iPods and mobile phones could be fitted with antitheft devices that detect ‘acoustic fingerprints’ so they only work when they are being used by the registered owner

Researchers have discovered that they can identify individuals from the faint sounds made deep inside the human ear and are now developing security devices using the technology.

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