Learning the Language of Monkey Talk

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After applying linguistic tools to the calls of monkeys, researchers
now think they can understand what our primate relatives are saying

Fiona Macdonald – Researchers have used human linguistic tools to translate the language of Campbell’s monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli), primates found in western Africa.

For years primatologists and linguists have been studying their advanced language to try to crack the code of monkey vocabulary, but now a team of researchers believe they may have finally done it, all thanks to the monkey term “krak”.

They found that Campbell’s monkeys in the Ivory Coast’s Tai Forest use the term krak to indicate that a leopard is nearby, and the sound “hok” to warn others that there’s an eagle circling overhead. You can listen to how these words sound over at Scientific American.

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New Evidence Humans Are Related To Orangutans

New Evidence Humans Are Related To Orangutans

Humans related to orangutans, not chimps 

New evidence underscores the theory of human origin that suggests humans most likely share a common ancestor with orangutans, according to research from the University of Pittsburgh and the Buffalo Museum of Science. Reporting in the June 18 edition of the Journal of Biogeography, the researchers reject as “problematic” the popular suggestion, based on DNA analysis, that humans are most closely related to chimpanzees, which they maintain is not supported by fossil evidence .

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Why Do We Have Fingerprints?

Why Do We Have Fingerprints? 

Why do people have fingerprints?

Fingerprints do not help primates grip, as previously thought, scientists have discovered. They actually reduce the friction needed to hold onto flat surfaces. Now Dr Roland Ennos and his team at The University of Manchester are trying to find out: why do we have them?

Dr Ennos, at the University’s Faculty of Life Sciences, said: “I have been thinking about this for years and, having played around with it for a bit, realised that skin is rubbery so the ridges in fingerprints might actually reduce grip.

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Japanese Scientists Create World’s First Transgenic Primates

Japanese Scientists Create World’s First Trangenic Primates 

Japanese scientists announced  they had created the world’s first transgenic primates, breeding monkeys with a gene that made the animals’ skin glow a fluorescent green.

In a controversial achievement, Japanese scientists announced on Wednesday they had created the world’s first transgenic primates, breeding monkeys with a gene that made the animals’ skin glow a fluorescent green.

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Monkey, A Mans New Best Friend

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Researchers find that capuchin monkeys love to give

Primate intelligence gives me cognitive dissonance. It’s fascinating that monkeys can recognize numbers, construct tools and even follow to-do lists. But it also bruises my ego, just slightly, knowing that monkeys aren’t that different from my parents, friends or heroes. (Michael Phelps excluded. He’s the übermensch.)

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Happy Hour In The Malaysian Rain Forest

Happy Hour In The Malaysian Rain Forest 

 Pen-tailed Tree Shrew of the Malaysian Rain Forest

German scientists have discovered that seven species of small mammals in the rain forests of western Malaysia drink fermented palm nectar on a regular basis. For several of the species, including the pen-tailed tree shrew, the nectar, which can have an alcohol content approaching that of beer, is the major food source – meaning they are chronic drinkers.

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