This technology platform, which was showcased by French technology company Dassault Systemes at the recently-concluded Consumer Electronics Show (CES), is christened the Living Heart.

By Shouvik Das

  • Physical design tests for such products can take 3-4 years. But virtual simulation models reduce the time to find the right design of an implant and subsequently test its strength and durability to just 3-4 months

Can the use of realistic 3D simulations of human organs like the heart and brain, transform medical care? Ganesh Sabat, chief executive officer of Mumbai-headquartered Sahajanand Medical Technologies–a cardiovascular implant manufacturer, believes it can.

An early user of virtual simulation technology in the country, the biggest advantage of this technology in the field of medical implant manufacturing is that it reduces the time to do an implant, according to Bapat. “Physical design tests for such products can take 3-4 years. But virtual simulation models reduce the time to find the right design of an implant and subsequently test its strength and durability to just 3-4 months,” he explained.

This technology platform, which was showcased by French technology company Dassault Systemes at the recently-concluded Consumer Electronics Show (CES), is christened the ‘Living Heart’. Frederic Vacher, head of innovation at Dassault’s global 3DExperience laboratory, said the platform’s biggest strength lies in the accurate rendition of a 3D model of an organ — produced through conventional medical imaging inputs.

“The clone replicates all the physics of the cardiovascular muscles, allowing the virtual twin of the heart to act like the real one, including blood flow and electric impulse simulation of the cardiac vessels,” Vacher explained.

It is this blood flow simulation that is critical for an implant manufacturer such as Sahajanand. “The basis of the technology is finite element analysis (FEA). If you’re trying to build a bridge, you’ll have many components for it. What we need to know for this are factors such as the strength that it can withstand, the duration through which it can do that, and so on. This is why we need simulation models to gauge stress, pressure points and stress distribution properties,” Sabat said.

The heart is one of the most important organs in the human body. Almost 900 gallons of blood pass through arteries daily, which is why a virtual 3D simulation of the heart is a very complex task. Dassault Systemes, as part of its ‘3DExperience’ platform, offers its so-called ‘Virtual Twins’. As the name suggests, the idea behind the technology is to recreate highly accurate versions of a real object.

According to the Dassault Systemes website, the Living Heart Model and use of virtual patients is expected to “…increase industry innovation and pave the way for faster approvals and quicker patient access to safe, effective new treatments for the world’s leading cause of death – heart disease”.

While these 3D simulations are being used to improve the durability of cardiac implants, companies have also begun using them to better understand the human brain and also do drug research. Under its life sciences arm, for instance, Dassault technology powers a number of research initiatives and even commercial ventures in India and around the world — in the pharmaceutical space. “Patient experience is the new frontier in drug development. The global biologics market is worth $375 billion, and 40 percent of pharmaceutical R&D is dedicated to biologic drugs. India, presently, is in the early stages of adoption of this tech,” Deepak NG, managing director at Dassault India, said.

Via LiveMint.com

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