Digital Twin Multi Network Models Could Aid Personalized Therapy, Biomarker, and Drug Discovery

An international team of researchers has developed advanced computer models, or “digital twins,” of diseases that can identify dynamic genome- and cellulome-wide, disease-associated changes in cells across time. Developed with the goal of improving diagnosis and treatment, the research, published in Genome Medicine, underlines the complexity of disease and the necessity of using the right treatment at the right time. The scientists, headed by Mikael Benson, PhD, at Linköping University, and Karolinska Institutet, reported on the development of one model to identify the most important disease protein in hay fever.

In their published paper, titled, “A dynamic single cell‑based framework for digital twins to prioritize disease genes and drug targets,” the investigators concluded, “We propose that our framework allows organization and prioritization of UR [upstream regulator] genes for biomarker and drug discovery. This may have far-reaching clinical implications, including identification of biomarkers for personalized treatment, new drug candidates, and time-dependent personalized prescriptions of drug combinations.”

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Forget VR headsets – Apple now has a patent for a VR car

By Hamish Hector 

Apple’s ready to take us on a wild ride

A new Apple patent hints at how the company could use VR to entertain passengers traveling in an autonomous car — while also helping reduce motion sickness to boot.

The released schematics reveal how a driverless car and a VR headset could work together to keep travelers entertained on their journeys. VR headset wearers could be dropped into a game, or they could invite friends and celebrities to be their virtual travel companions.

On the business side, the patent (first mentioned on PatentlyApple) also showed how users could attend a business meeting while on the move – on the back of a flatbed truck no less. Rather than being confined to a virtual meeting room, you’d be able to look out at passing scenery, so you’d be less likely to become disoriented and motion-sick.

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Building Scientifically Accurate Digital Twins Using Modulus with Omniverse and AI

By Bhoomi Gadhia 

From physics-informed neural networks (PINNs) to neural operators, developers have long sought after the ability to build real-time digital twins with true-to-form rendering, robust visualizations, and synchronization with the physical system in the real world by streaming live sensor data. The latest release of Modulus brings us closer to this reality.

Modulus 22.03, the cutting-edge framework for developing physics-based machine learning models, offers developers key capabilities such as novel physics informed and data-driven AI architectures, and integration into the Omniverse (OV) platform.

This release takes a major step toward building precise simulations and interactive visualization capabilities for engineers and researchers with the Modulus OV extension. This enhancement is bolstered by new AI architectures that can learn from data using neural operators. Additional enhancements to facilitate precise modeling of problems such as turbulence have been added in this latest version of Modulus, as well as features to improve training convergence.

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Holoride’s in-car VR tech arrives in Audi vehicles this summer | Engadget

Virtual reality is coming to Audi vehicles. On Saturday, the automaker announced it would support Holoride’s in-car VR technology starting this summer.

In June, select Audi models with the company’s MIB 3 infotainment system, including the A4, A6, A8, Q5 and , will ship with the necessary software to sync with Holoride-compatible headsets, with the company planning to support the feature first in Germany, the UK and US before making it available in other markets.

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HTC aims to turn your carpool into a VR roller coaster

By Andy Zahn

Boring carpool got you down? Road trips with the family turning your hair prematurely gray? Holoride and HTC might have just the solution to make you look forward to your daily commute, and to turn unruly passengers into quiescent drooling zombies. They intend to bring VR to your car.

More specifically, the concept they’re pitching involves XR (Extended Reality), which includes a wider selection of sci-fi goggle-based content than just VR. The tech being debuted today takes advantage of the new HTC Vive Flow VR headset, which Digital Trends mobile editor Ajay Kumar got to test out last fall. This device differs from your garden-variety VR headset in that it’s more like wearing a big pair of sunglasses.

It’s quite expensive, and limited in some ways compared to other stand-alone and PC-connected headsets, but it solves the weight and bulk issues that have been a part of what’s held back mainstream VR popularity. Where other headsets are designed to stay at home, the Vive Flow is designed for life on the go.

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Scientists are developing interactive holograms you can touch and feel

21st century, holograms are already being used in a variety of ways.

The TV show “Star Trek: The Next Generation” introduced millions of people to the idea of a holodeck: an immersive, realistic 3D holographic projection of a complete environment that you could interact with and even touch.

In the 21st century, holograms are already being used in a variety of ways such as medical systems, education, art, security and defense. Scientists are still developing ways to use lasers, modern digital processors, and motion-sensing technologies to create several different types of holograms which could change the way we interact.

My colleagues and I working in the University of Glasgow’s bendable electronics and sensing technologies research group have now developed a system of holograms of people using “aerohaptics,” creating feelings of touch with jets of air. Those jets of air deliver a sensation of touch on people’s fingers, hands and wrists.

In time, this could be developed to allow you to meet a virtual avatar of a colleague on the other side of the world and really feel their handshake. It could even be the first steps towards building something like a holodeck.

To create this feeling of touch we use affordable, commercially available parts to pair computer-generated graphics with carefully directed and controlled jets of air.

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‘Virtual surgeons’ to be able to join operations anywhere

A company pioneering technology to allow surgeons to virtually ‘scrub in’ to any operating room in the world is partnering with Vodafone to speed up adoption in Europe.

The Proximie platform was developed with funding from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), as part of the medicines manufacturing challenge’s Digital Health Technology Catalyst.

It will help reduce variations in care and ensure every patient receives the best healthcare every single time.

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New VR Boots Allow Users to ‘Physically’ Explore Virtual Spaces

They could solve VR’s ‘infinite walking’ problem.

By  Chris Young

 

One of the surprising issues with virtual reality headsets to date has been user safety — get too immersed in the experience and you might find yourself leaping and bounding in virtual reality only to smash against the floor in your momentarily-forgotten physical reality.

One firm, Ekto VR, believes it may have a solution to this problem with its new “EKTO ONE” boots, a report from YankoDesign reveals. The company’s new technology allows users to walk on the spot in order to traverse a virtual space.

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3D virtual simulations assist in human heart implants, brain research

This technology platform, which was showcased by French technology company Dassault Systemes at the recently-concluded Consumer Electronics Show (CES), is christened the Living Heart.

By Shouvik Das

  • Physical design tests for such products can take 3-4 years. But virtual simulation models reduce the time to find the right design of an implant and subsequently test its strength and durability to just 3-4 months

Can the use of realistic 3D simulations of human organs like the heart and brain, transform medical care? Ganesh Sabat, chief executive officer of Mumbai-headquartered Sahajanand Medical Technologies–a cardiovascular implant manufacturer, believes it can.

An early user of virtual simulation technology in the country, the biggest advantage of this technology in the field of medical implant manufacturing is that it reduces the time to do an implant, according to Bapat. “Physical design tests for such products can take 3-4 years. But virtual simulation models reduce the time to find the right design of an implant and subsequently test its strength and durability to just 3-4 months,” he explained.

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Panasonic is crafting a tiny pair of VR goggles called the MeganeX

By Adrian Willings

(Pocket-lint) – Panasonic has been working on VR glasses for a while. Originally revealing its future offerings back in 2020. Now we have a proper device in the form of the MeganeX.

At this year’s CES, the company has shown off a tiny pair of compact VR goggles designed to work with SteamVR. These VR goggles use MicroOLED technology capable of delivering 2,560×2,560 pixels per eye with a 120Hz refresh rate and 10-bit HDR. 

MeganeX promises to be ultra-compact and ultra-lightweight, coming in at just 250g. It’s built with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon XR1 chipset but isn’t designed to be a standalone headset. Instead, the goggles need to be tethered to a gaming PC in order to run. 

Plug MeganeX into a PC with a USB able and you’ll be able to play SteamVR games and apps without fuss. MeganeX supports 6DoF head tracking and is designed to work with “almost all” SteamVR applications. Though no controller has been revealed at this point. 

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Neuroscientists are using virtual reality to unlock a whole new world of brain research

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany is using virtual reality to help us shed some light on one of the world’s greatest mysteries: emotions and our human brains.

For years, researchers have struggled to figure out how human brains process complex emotions. This is because replicating real human emotions within the controlled environment of a laboratory, a necessity for standardizing several variables is extremely difficult. However, the aforementioned team of scientists has circumvented this issue as best they could in a revolutionary way using virtual reality.

The team conducted a study to monitor the neural activity of emotionally charged humans by using the cutting-edge technology of virtual reality. The participants in the study put on VR glasses that made them feel as though they were in the cars of a rollercoaster ride. On this ride, they go through many exhilarating highs and lows. Their journey starts off as a steady roll through picturesque mountain landscapes, then suddenly they are frantically dashing through a raging fire, and lastly, after a tense moment of teetering on the edge, they fall into the depths of an abyss.

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A virtual world pioneer has doubts about the metaverse

Philip Rosedale American businessman, founder of Second Life

By Stephen Totilo

Early metaverse architect Philip Rosedale is no longer confident the metaverse will be a huge hit, despite the surging interest from Meta (fka Facebook) and many other companies.

Driving the news: Rosedale, who evangelized the concept of an immersive virtual world while overseeing the storied platform “Second Life” a decade ago, shared more tempered thoughts in an interview with Axios.

  • Of the metaverse, he says: “I think what we’ve learned — and somewhat with some sadness, given the work that I’ve done, I would have to agree — is that it’s not for everybody, and maybe it’s never for everybody.”
  • And of Meta’s chances of succeeding with their new metaverse project: “Well, I hope they don’t.”
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