New Deep-Sea Life Forms in the Atlantic Ocean

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Purple-winged enteropneust. Photo: David Shale

Scientists first thought that the deep valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a massive undersea mountain in the Atlantic Ocean, was too harsh a climate for life. But when they explored the region down to the depths of 12,000 feet, they discovered a myriad of intriguing species, including this strange purple worm:

Blind, purple, and peculiar, this primitive, deep-sea life-form may be akin to the common ancestor of humans and all other backboned animals, according to scientists.’

One of three new species of enteropneust acorn worm discovered during the mid-Atlantic survey, the creature has no eyes, no obvious sense organs, and no brain. “This is about as primitive as you can go,” team member Monty Priede said.

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Canada To Lead A Search For Arctic Explorer’s Ships

Canada To Lead A Search For Arctic Explorer’s Ships 

 Skulls of members of the Franklin Expedition, discovered and buried by William Skinner and Paddy Gibson in 1945, at King William Island.

For more than 160 years, the fate of British explorer Sir John Franklin and his men has remained locked in the frozen Arctic, but warming temperatures are threatening to change that.

 

 

 

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Dumping Old Subway Cars Into the Atlantic

Dumping Old Subway Cars Into the Atlantic

The setup certainly doesn’t make it sound positive: The Redbird Reef off the coast of Slaughter Beach, Delaware is a dump site for retired New York City subway cars, and there are already nearly 700 of them on the ocean floor. Before you cry foul, consider the words of Jeff Tinsman, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s artificial reef program manager, who told the New York Times: “They’re basically luxury condominiums for fish.” (Pics)

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