Robot warfighters could reduce civilian casualties, calling for a ban now is premature

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Ronald C. Arkin:  I’ve been engaged in the debate over autonomous robotic military systems for almost 10 years. I am not averse to a ban, but I’m convinced we should continue researching this technology for the time being. One reason is that I believe such systems might be capable of reducing civilian casualties and property damage when compared to the performance of human warfighters. Thus, it is a contention that calling for an outright ban on this technology is premature, as some groups already are doing.

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Injectable foam stops internal bleeding on the battlefield

The polyurethane foam begins as two liquids stored separately and injected together into the abdominal cavity.

Despite the best efforts of military first responders to stabilize abdominal wounds sustained on the battlefield, they have few options when it comes to stopping internal bleeding caused by gunshots or explosive fragments.  DARPA is studying a new type of injectable foam that molds to organs and slows hemorrhaging. This could provide field medics with a way to buy more time for soldiers en route to medical treatment facilities.

 

 

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U.S. Military Developing Flying Car That Could Be Ready by 2015

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The vehicle will be able to travel 280 miles by land and air, using vertical take-off and landing to increase access to difficult terrain.

US troops in war-torn Afghanistan may soon get a new mode of transportation as top military bosses are considering procuring advanced vehicles that can also fly over the battlefield to avoid enemy attacks.

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Monkeys Trained As Battlefield Killers In Afghanistan

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Showing Off A Killer Monkey
Afghanistan’s Taliban warlords have developed a bizarre way to deal with foreign forces: they have trained monkeys who love to eat bananas and peanuts to be killers. Taliban forces have taught monkeys how to use the Kalashnikov, Bren light machine gun and trench mortars. They also teach them how to identify and attack soldiers wearing U.S. military uniforms.

Ironically, the idea of training monkeys to fight was first invented by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. The CIA in the Vietnam War initiated a program that used the peanuts and bananas as prizes to train some “monkey soldiers” to kill Vietnamese in the jungle.

It is reported that these monkey soldiers are mainly composed of macaques and baboons hunted at an early age in the jungle and sold to the Taliban…
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How Future Computer Games Will Simulate Real Smells Of War

How Future Computer Games Will Simulate Real Smells Of War

Jars holding the aromas. Realistic smells could soon be added to video games.  

It is one of the most memorable lines in movie history. As the air around him is rent by explosions and the whiz of bullets, Colonel Kilgore stands nonchalantly with hands on hips, sniffs the acrid breeze and declares: ‘I love the smell of napalm in the morning.’
 

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Robomedic

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Snakebots can save lives or at least remind you of a creepy scifi movie

The first 30 minutes after a battlefield injury are dire: that’s when nearly 86 percent of battlefield deaths occur. Before attending to the wounded, frontline physicians have to quickly locate the casualty and extract him from the battlefield, often under heavy fire. This can take up costly minutes, as well as expose medics themselves as possible targets. Continue reading… “Robomedic”

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Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions

Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions 

The Palo Alto Research Center is using ink-jet printing technology to develop a disposable patch that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet for seven days to measure his or her exposure to blasts. 

Researchers are developing a cheap, lightweight plastic strip that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet to help diagnose brain injury.

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U.S. Military Working On Creating “Thought Helmets”

U.S. Military Working On Creating “Thought Helmets” 

From the “how the hell did we miss this” department comes word that the U.S. military is hard at work creating “thought helmets” for its soldiers. If fully realized, this mind-interfacing piece of gear would allow for what plebeians would call magic, and Arthur C. Clark would call basic telepathy. The “good” news is the Army believes telepathic communication between soldiers in the field is entirely possible, some day. The bad news is that “some day” is decades away for this incredibly ambitious plan-this ain’t no video game controller, folks.

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