Biomarker for Autism discovered

Autism biomarker 21345

Researchers have identified the reduced activity in a part of the brain associated
with empathy and argue it may be a ‘biomarker’ for a familial risk of autism.

Siblings of people with autism show a similar pattern of brain activity to that seen in people with autism when looking at emotional facial expressions. Researchers at the University of Cambridge identified the reduced activity in a part of the brain associated with empathy and argue it may be a ‘biomarker’ for a familial risk of autism…

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People Who ‘Look Younger’ Live Longer

composite-twins-photo

“Left hand image represents twins who looked younger for their age (average perceived age 64, range 57-69) than those represented by right hand image (average perceived age 74, range 70-78).”

People blessed with youthful faces are more likely to live to a ripe old age than those who look more than their years, work shows. Danish scientists say appearance alone can predict survival, after they studied 387 pairs of twins.

 

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New Laser Probe Developed For Space Program Could Spot Cataracts Earlier

New Laser Probe Developed For Space Program Could Spot Cataracts Earlier 

 A beam of light from a slit-lamp microscope focused on a cataract.

Cataracts are the single biggest cause of blindness and are responsible for almost half of all cases worldwide. A new laser probe, originally developed for the U.S. space program, has been shown to detect the condition earlier than is otherwise possible. Its developers say that the technique can tell that a cataract is forming even when an eye looks perfectly clear.

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A New Way To Detect Cancer Early

A New Way To Detect Cancer Early 

 

A prototype device employs the same magnetic phenomenon used to write data to computer hard drives.

A new system for detecting cancer proteins uses the same magnetic phenomenon that lets computer hard drives read and write data. The Stanford University researchers developing the system hope that it will detect cancer in its earlier stages, when it’s easier to treat. MagArray, a startup in Sunnyvale, CA, will commercialize the technology.

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